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ESPN To Broadcast From San Francisco’s Marina Green

Jason Barrett

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ESPN has chosen Marina Green in San Francisco as its production headquarters for Super Bowl 50. From Wednesday, Feb. 3, through Sunday, Feb. 7, 45 hours of original content will originate from two outdoor stages and an adjacent demo field in the 74-acre waterfront expanse in the city’s Marina District.

Live daily editions of SportsCenter, NFL Insiders, NFL Live and a special three-hour Super Bowl edition of Postseason NFL Countdown are among the television shows that will air from Marina Green. Multiple ESPN Deportes and ESPN International shows will also be based in San Francisco during Super Bowl week, culminating with ESPN Deportes’ Spanish-language telecast of Super Bowl 50.

Additionally, from Feb. 3-5, ESPN Radio’s Mike and Mike and ESPN2’s First Take will originate from nearby Fort Mason – totaling an additional 18 hours of programming, while ESPN Radio’s Russillo & Kanell will broadcast live from the NFL Media Center’s Radio Row at the Moscone Center.

Chris Berman, Tedy Bruschi, Cris Carter, Trent Dilfer, Mike Ditka, Tom Jackson, Ron Jaworski, Keyshawn Johnson, Suzy Kolber, Ray Lewis, Steve Levy, Wendi Nix, Adam Schefter, Hannah Storm, Trey Wingo and Steve Young are among the many on-air commentators expected to be featured throughout the week, along with top guests from the world of sports and entertainment.

ESPN Deportes and ESPN’s International veteran team of NFL commentators will also be featured throughout the week reporting from San Francisco including Alvaro Martin, Super Bowl-winning kicker Raul Allegre, John Sutcliffe, Carlos Nava, Ciro Procuna, Eduardo Varela, Kary Correa, Mauricio Pedroza, Pablo Viruega, Roberto Garza, Sebastian Martinez Christensen and Sergio Dipp.

Program schedules will be released at a later date and all shows will be open for public viewing. ESPN’s set-up will begin January 29.

“With iconic landmarks, the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz, as our backdrop, Marina Green will provide the perfect setting and a constant reminder to football fans watching our shows that we are in the heart of San Francisco for Super Bowl week,” said Seth Markman, ESPN’s senior coordinating producer in charge of NFL studio shows and ESPN’s Super Bowl week coverage. “We are very appreciative of the San Francisco Bay Area Super Bowl Host Committee for welcoming ESPN and helping us secure such an ideal location.”

In addition to the company’s television and radio production plans for Super Bowl, ESPN will host the invitation-only “ESPN The Party” on Friday, Feb. 5, at Fort Mason. Annually one of Super Bowl week’s most popular nightlife events, the performers and sponsors will be announced later this week.

Credit to ESPN Media Zone who originally published this information

Sports TV News

Stephen A. Smith Slams Washington Post For Jerry Jones Reporting

“But you’re going to bring up a photo of him when he was 14, 15 years old? 65 or 66 years ago? This is where cancel culture gets into the mix.”

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Stephen A. Smith

After reporting from The Washington Post revealed a photo of Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones standing on the steps of North Little Rock High School as six black students attempted to integrate in 1957, ESPN commentator Stephen A. Smith has slammed the outlet’s reporting and defended Jones on First Take Monday.

“I’m pretty pissed off,” said Smith. “I’m pissed off but not for reasons that people would think. I am very, very fond of Jerry Jones, and I’m not hiding that from anybody. Is his record perfect? No, but I’m pissed off because he doesn’t deserve what just happened. He doesn’t deserve it. One report, our report, said he was 14 years old. Another report said he was 15 years old. At minimum that’s 65 years ago.

“You’re going to bring up a picture of Jerry Jones standing at this protest — no question — what was happening is not something that anybody — as a black person — should be appreciative about. You had six students trying to desegregate the school,” Smith said before stating that racism is still “alive and well’ in America, noting black men especially face it daily.

“But you’re going to bring up a photo of him when he was 14, 15 years old? 65 or 66 years ago? This is where cancel culture gets into the mix. You’re making an attempt to eradicate him, what he stands for and all he has done.”

Smith continued by saying he doesn’t have a problem with the photo, and Jones’ youth changes the potential for outrage, noting if he was 30 or 35 rather than a teenager, that would be a bigger indicator of his character.

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Sports TV News

Gus Johnson: ‘Nobody Ever Told Me I Was Doing It Wrong’

“I just want to delight in the excellence of these young men and women that I have the chance to call because I know it’s so important to them because it’s important to me.”

Ricky Keeler

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Gus Johnson

While fans get to hear Gus Johnson call big college football and college basketball games and get to see his reactions to memorable moments, he unfortunately never gets to see his own reaction, but he just enjoys being a part of sports, such as when he called Michigan-Ohio State for FOX this past Saturday.

Johnson was a guest on The Rich Eisen Show last week and he said while calling a game, he never wants to be too controversial and he appreciates that people choose to watch him during their times of relaxation.

“They say you never see yourself, you only see a reflection. You’ve never seen your face. You’ve only seen a reflection of your face as a human being. I can’t see myself. I would love to see myself during those moments because I sometimes don’t really understand the reaction. To me, I’m just watching the game, I’m a fan. I’m a journalist and I take that seriously, but more than anything, I’m just a fan of sports. Thank God for sports.

“People for the last almost 30 years have allowed me to come into their homes during their times of relaxation, rest, to spend time with their families. That’s important to me. When I call the game, I don’t want to be too controversial. I’m not trying to be 60 Minutes. I just want to delight in the excellence of these young men and women that I have the chance to call because I know it’s so important to them because it’s important to me. It connects you to great moments in your life and in your mind.”

Before he got to FOX, Johnson was at CBS Sports from 1995-2011 calling some memorable NCAA Tournament games and NFL games that went down to the wire. In an era where criticism can be found easily, Johnson told Eisen that he never received criticism about his broadcast style from any of his bosses:

“Nobody ever told me that I was doing it wrong. That’s one thing I loved about the CBS experience. At CBS Sports, we had different kind of broadcasters. Our leader back then and still is Jim Nantz. He had his own style. We had Verne Lundquist, we had Dick Enberg there during that time. Don Criqui was there during that time. Not one time did anybody ever tell me that I wasn’t doing it right. Nobody ever said ‘Gus, don’t do it that way’. I would get negative criticism when the Internet started, but not from my bosses.”

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Sports TV News

Scott Hanson Clarifies NFL RedZone Missteps During Raiders/Seahawks

Hanson believed in the moment that CBS was airing the overtime period to a national audience. But due to NFL broadcasting rules, the game was only available on select stations.

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NFL RedZone host Scott Hanson ruffled feathers for many football fans Sunday when he told viewers to switch from the channel to their local CBS affiliates to see the conclusion of the Las Vegas Raiders and Seattle Seahawks game.

Unfortunately, for both viewers and Hanson, the game was only being shown in a small portion of the country, with the rest of the nation’s CBS affiliates already airing 60 Minutes. The game was also available to NFL Sunday Ticket subscribers.

Hanson took to Twitter Sunday evening to explain what happened on the air and to apologize for the miscalculation.

Hanson believed in the moment that CBS was airing the overtime period to a national audience. But due to NFL broadcasting rules, the game was only available to stations in the Las Vegas, Fresno, Sacramento, Reno, Eugene, Portland, Boise, Seattle, and Spokane markets on the west coast. Additionally, the game was available in Chicago, Tampa, Atlanta, and Charlotte.

He apologized for the mistake and said he would have more details at a later date.

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