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Sports Television Networks Don’t Need to Overpay Debate Pundits

“You can remove one zero and one comma from their annual wages. That’s all the networks need to pay.”

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Next time I pass the CAA building in Century City, I’ll be shouted down by talent agents who won’t like the dirty secret I’m about to tell. They can get right in line, joining the numerous haters who can’t handle the truth in this space. Know the $8 million salary of Stephen A. Smith, the $6 million salary of Skip Bayless and the salaries of other leading loudmouths in the sports debate industry?

You can remove one zero and one comma from their annual wages.

That’s all the networks need to pay.

And maybe they’re finally starting to get it, with Fox Sports 1 cutting ties with Jason Whitlock, whose paltry ratings on “Speak For Yourself’’ spoke for themselves. Please don’t attach this breakup as an attack on black America in the violent aftermath of George Floyd’s murder, as some media dramatists might try. If anything, Fox is defending black America, given Whitlock’s provocative commentaries on race and politics.

Recently, with a take incendiary even by his standards, he accused LeBron James of exploiting Michael Jordan’s aversion to social activism after the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, when James wrote, “We’re literally hunted EVERYDAY/EVERYTIME we step foot outside the comfort of our homes! Can’t even go for a damn jog man! Like WTF man are you kidding me?!?!?!?!?!? ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!!!! I’m sorry Ahmaud(Rest In Paradise) and my prayers and blessings sent to the heavens above to your family.” James’ anger is justified today after another sickening episode of police brutality — and Whitlock’s position looks embarrassing. “This isn’t helpful. It’s twitter-trolling,’’ tweeted Whitlock, claiming James was grandstanding as Jordan was winning critical and ratings acclaim in “The Last Dance’’ documentary series. “It’s using this man’s tragedy to build a brand as more outspoken than Michael Jordan. There are all kinds of ways to draw attention to this tragedy. Suggesting that we are hunted everyday/every time is just s–t-stirring.”

LeBron James Says 'Blacks Are Hunted EVERY TIME We Go Outside ...

But trust me when I say Fox doesn’t care what comes from Whitlock’s mouth if the ratings justify his bluster. They didn’t, sometimes sinking to the level of Kansas City drive-time radio. Simply, the network bosses let his deal expire, realizing they didn’t have to hand him bigger money.

I have personal knowledge in this particular area. For eight years, I was the most-utilized regular panelist on ESPN’s “Around The Horn,’’ appearing on the vast majority of daily shows during the program’s high-popularity era. Every ratings period, a producer would report in our conference call that the numbers rose yet again, to the point a project once mocked as a “Pardon The Interruption’’ knockoff was approaching the commercial success of Tony Kornheiser and Michael Wilbon. Airing each weeknight at 5pm ET, ATH was responsible for generating lead-in momentum for PTI.

Damned if we weren’t about to pass the old men. At one point, we were creeping toward a million viewers daily, and while this was before cord-cutting and cord-nevers and Netflix and YouTube and various iterations of Facebook, our impact was staggering. I couldn’t walk down the street without someone asking if Woody Paige is really that goofy (he is). Charles Barkley, who often would rip me and Bayless on TNT, bought me beers in a Cleveland bar. I’d be standing in a terminal at O’Hare, waiting for a late afternoon flight, when someone would look at me, then at the TV above, and say, “If you’re that guy, how can you be standing here?’’ Some trashy websites no longer with us — R.I.H. (Rot In Hell) — would cover me like Justin Bieber. In Florence, we’d just finished walking 463 stairs to the top of the Duomo when a kid in a Ohio State jersey yelled, “Around The Horn!’’ When a panelist was involved in a court case that later was dropped, the New York Post headline read: “AROUND THE HORNY.’’ We were parodied by “Saturday Night Live.’’

Judge Judy had to be nervous. Montel Williams, too. Maybe even the local newscasts. Maybe even Ellen DeGeneres, though probably not.

TBT: As Around the Horn turns 15, a look back at the very first ...

And what was my biggest annual salary for a hit show that more than doubled Smith’s typical ratings on ESPN’s “First Take,’’ drew five times Bayless’s typical ratings on Fox Sports 1’s “Undisputed’’ and safely can call itself the second-most-watched show — the numbers don’t lie — in the history of Embrace Debate programming?

About $300,000, not counting summer pay when subbing for Kornheiser beside the sacred PTI mugshot cutouts. With inflation, call it $500,000 by today’s rates. And I actually employed one of those Hollywood agents, a guy who ordered wild boar ragu on his pappardelle.

“Know how much money we’re making for ESPN?’’ I’d mumble under my breath every time a new title sponsor was introduced.

Stop before you accuse me of complaining. To this day, I’m grateful to have made the annual six-figure, one-comma salary long enough to put my kids through college and feed the dog. I would have done the show for free. But would someone explain what was happening in John Skipper’s head — perhaps I shouldn’t ask — when the former ESPN president went bankroll-bonkers on Stephen A.’s compensation? I’m all for people in sports media getting PAID, in a business that might not exist next week, but when only Tony Romo is making more than Smith in the all-time roll call of sportscasters, um, what the hell? A laughable travesty, Howard Cosell is venting somewhere. Bob Costas, the G.O.A.T. of his genre, was well worth his $7 million a year at NBC. Al Michaels and Joe Buck are worth their $6 million. Jim Nantz is worth his $5 million.

Why? Their audiences, for major events, are in the megamillions. They call the games that serve as gold and sustenance for their networks.

Stephen A.? He yells at Max Kellerman, who used to yell at me.

Bayless? He shouts down Shannon Sharpe, who seems oddly respectful of a guy whose ass I kicked when we were Chicago columnists.

Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless Are Pro Wrestlers, Not ...

But as an effective tag team on ESPN, Smith and Bayless became valuable when their urban-meets-Bible-belt act generated rare credible numbers in late mornings, a slot formerly surrendered to “SportsCenter’’ reruns. Fox Sports 1, trying to make a splash as a new player, chose to break up the Bristol band by throwing huge money at Bayless. ESPN had no choice but to appease Smith with epic money.

The model could be changing, though, at least at Fox. Bayless, whose lukewarm ratings also don’t justify his salary, might have to accept a sizable pay cut. Or, maybe FS1 abandons a debate element that hasn’t approached ESPN’s success in the twisting-and-shouting arena.

As someone who has engaged in past Twitter crossfire with Whitlock, I looked for a reaction on his feed. All I saw was this, from Sunday: “God’s design. One mouth. Two ears. Two eyes. We should all do 4 times as much listening and observing as talking. Don’t be afraid to reflect, acquire knowledge and listen to others with more wisdom. Social media compels us to speak even when we have little of substance to say.’’

Imagine, Whitlock with little to say about the world.

Maybe it’s because everyone stopped listening. And watching.

BSM Writers

Sam Mayes Got A Raw Deal But Tyler Media Made The Right Call

“You are being naive if you think a company should stand behind an employee that has put themselves in this situation.”

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I do not envy whoever at Tyler Media had to make a decision about Sam Mayes’s future with the company after audio of a private conversation in 2016 was leaked to the media. Mayes and now-former co-worker Cara Rice made a few racist jokes at the expense of Native Americans.

The recording, according to Mayes, was made without his knowledge and leaked illegally. He says in a recorded statement that he should have been given the opportunity to address the recording on air and make amends.

OKC Radio Host Sam Mayes Fired After Racist Audio is Leaked

Maybe that is true, maybe it isn’t. I hate for Sam to lose his job as the result of an illegal recording of a private conversation, but the fact is, that conversation isn’t private anymore. Tyler Media didn’t really have an option here. Sam Mayes had to go.

Someone had an illegal recording of the conversation and created an anonymous email account to send it to people in the Oklahoma City media. I was shown a copy of the email. The author states clearly that their goal is to see Mayes and Rice out of a job. There is nothing fair or just about that person getting exactly what they want. It feels slimy. I can’t say that it feels like it wasn’t the right call though.

We have debated whether or not someone should lose their job over comments made in a private conversation many times before. It happens in every field. It wasn’t long ago at all that we were having this same debate about Jon Gruden. His emails to Bruce Allen and others were sent in private. Is it fair he had to go when they were made public? No matter what horrible things were in there, they were said with the understanding that it would stay between friends.

I am going to say the same thing about Sam Mayes that I did about Gruden when that story first broke. You are being naive if you think a company should stand behind an employee that has put themselves in this situation.

You read that right. The circumstances of how the conversations in these examples came to light are absolutely unfair, but the conversations came to light. How it happened is irrelevant. Any sponsor or boss that stands behind Sam Mayes or Jon Gruden would be endorsing the language they used, either inadvertently or very much on purpose. Try explaining that to a sponsor.

People at Tyler Media may know Sam Mayes’s heart. He doesn’t seem like a bad guy. The fact of the matter is, once the audio became public, their hands were tied. There is no mistaking what was said or who said it.

How can any seller or manager take Mayes to advertisers now? How can they put him in front of the Lucky Star Casino, one of the station’s biggest advertisers? They can ask for an audience to let Sam explain himself and try to make amends. The Cheyenne and Arapahoe Tribes, who own the casino, are under no obligation to forgive or even listen.

All About the Lucky Star Casino in El Reno, Concho
Courtesy: TripAdvisor/Adam Knapp

Maybe the day will come where Sam Mayes bounces back. I hope it does. I hope he gets the chance to address his comments with members of Oklahoma’s Native American community and listen to what they have to say in response. I do think it sucks that this is how his time at The Franchise comes to an end, but I get it.

If I have to explain to you why not to say dumb, racist shit, then I don’t think we have much to talk about. But, it is worth noting that the recording of Mayes and Rice’s conversation is proof that privacy is always an assumption, not always a fact.

In his audio statement, Mayes admits it is his voice on the recording. He also says that he was uncomfortable with Rice’s comments and he tried to end their conversation. I’ll take him at his word, but I will also point out that before he tried to end the conversation, he joined in on the jokes. Maybe when someone says that Native Americans are “too drunk to organize” it isn’t a great idea to respond. All it leads to is proof of you saying something dumb and racist.

Again, I’ll reiterate that how these comments came to light is unfair, but they did come to light. That is Sam Mayes’s voice on the recording. He is joining in on the jokes about Native Americans being drunks and addicts. At the end of the day, the only thing that was done to him was the audio being released. He fully and willingly committed the firable offense.

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What is the response to a client or potential client when they bring that up? All Tyler Media can do is try to recover and move forward. The company cannot do that with Mayes on the payroll.

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BSM Writers

Stop Prospecting, Start Strategizing!

“You cannot put a price tag on authenticity. It’s very rare and hard to find these days.”

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Struggling to get new business appointments? Dreading making prospecting calls? Having trouble writing creative emails that seemingly never get a response?

Generating responses to new business outreach is easier than you think. Just make sure you do your homework first and keep it “Simple Stupid”.

To do that, start with asking yourself these (3) simple questions:

#1: Did I do my home work on the business itself, their competition and those I plan on reaching out to?

#2: If I were on the other end of the phone and/or email with myself would I want to engage in conversation and/or reply to that email?

#3: Am I prepared to make a one call close given the opportunity to?

If the answer to any of these is “No”… do NOT pick up the phone and by all means do NOT hit the send button on that initial outreach email! Doing so will all but ensure you fall flat on your face. On the off chance you do happen to get the decision maker on the phone you won’t make that great first impression that sometimes can be so crucial. First impressions are always important… ALWAYS!

Skipping over these critical steps is a sure-fire way to ensure your email is completely ignored and will not generate the engagement from the prospect you’d hope for. Successful prospecting is all about the front end digging and research. Do your homework first then strategize a plan of attack for your call and/or email. Taking these extra measures on the front end is absolutely “Mission Critical” and will set you up for much more success with your prospecting endeavors.

Now once you’ve answered “Yes” to all of the above, you’re ready to attack with the knowledge and confidence that should set you a part from your competition. It’s all about the Game Plan, and if you don’t have one, you’re destined for failure time and time again. Incorporate these (5) things into your prospecting Game Plan for your next call/email and watch your results dramatically improve:

#1: MAKE IT PERSONAL & CASUAL – Be informal, find out something interesting about them.

#2: MAKE IT SHORT & CONCISE – Be straight forward and to the point, people are busy.

#3: MAKE IT TIMELY & RELEVANT TO THEM AND/OR THEIR BUSINESS – Give them a good Valid Business Reason.

#4: MAKE IT INTERESTING, COMPELLING & INFORMATIVE – Be the expert they’re missing.

#5: MAKE IT FUN – Fun people are easy to do business with and make it less like “work”.

Lastly, and most importantly, Be Yourself! You cannot put a price tag on authenticity. It’s very rare and hard to find these days. When clients do find it trust me, they value it and appreciate it way more than you’ll ever know!

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BSM Writers

Good Producers Can Teach The World A Lot About Christmas

“A lot has to be accomplished in the lead-up to Christmas. So much of it happens in the background without much recognition.”

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Who is Carl Christmas in your house? Who is the one that makes sure everyone that needs to get a card does? Who comes up with the plan for the lights? Who takes the reins on the shopping?

Chevy Chase, aka Clark Griswold, to light up stage in Berks | Berks  Regional News | wfmz.com
Courtesy: Warner Bros./National Lampoon

Every home needs one and in my house, that’s me. December (including the last week of November) is my time to shine, baby!

One thing I have tried to impress upon my mom and wife this year is that shipping and supply chain delays are real. So, if you are planning on procrastinating on your online shopping this year (you know, like usual) someone (me) is going to have no presents under the tree.

Veteran producers are used to operate this way. Young producers, listen up. Your job involves the most delicate balance of any in sports radio. You have to help bring your host’s and PD’s visions to life. That means you have to be able to take their direction. But you also have to keep the host on target. That means you cannot be afraid to be forceful and lead when the moment demands it.

There’s no value to being an unrepentant asshole to people, but you do have to hold them accountable. Look at that Christmas shopping example again. If you want to get what you want, you need to keep on task the people you know aren’t paying attention to the potential roadblocks. It isn’t selfish. It is making sure everyone gets the holiday W they are expecting. Sure, you would be disappointed if your gift doesn’t arrive on time, but so will the gift giver.

Being a stickler for the clock or moving a host off of a topic that has no value is the same thing. Of course there is something in it for you, but you are also helping the host do his or her job better. They may get annoyed with you now, but if you save them from an ass-chewing from the bosses or slipping ratings, then they have reaped the benefits.

I guess the unfortunate difference here is that there may be no acknowledgment of what you did or helped them to avoid. Oh well. Every producer has to expect a certain level of thanklessness.

Producers have to take on that Carl Christmas role in dealing with sales too. Remember, just because the producer’s name isn’t on the show doesn’t mean that isn’t every bit his or her show that it is the hosts’.

It’s like decorating your house for the holidays. You may have a certain design in mind. Maybe you have a traditional look you stick to every year. If your spouse or your kid comes home with a giant, inflatable Santa Claus in a military helicopter that they want on the lawn, you have a decision to make. Are you going to say no and suggest an alternative that aligns more with your goal or are you going to let your plan get run over?

25 Best Christmas Inflatables - Top Inflatable Christmas Decorations

Sales has a job to do. It is to make sure their clients’ messages are heard and to make money for the station. Both can be accomplished without sacrificing your show’s quality.

If a seller comes to you and says he wants his client to come in for five minutes and talk about now being the time to book an appointment to have your garage floors redone, you have to speak up. You have an obligation to make sure that the seller knows that even five minutes of that will hurt the show and have listeners diving for the preset buttons on their car stereo. That isn’t good for the station or his client.

Instead, offer to work with the seller and the client to come up with a piece of content that the client can put his name on and a 20-second ad read behind. Will the audience stick around to listen to some dude named Jerry talk about garage floors or will more people listen to you talk about the NFL playoff picture in a creative way and then still be there to hear Jerry’s message about garage floors? The answer seems obvious.

A lot has to be accomplished in the lead-up to Christmas. So much of it happens in the background without much recognition. If the background work wasn’t done though, the problems would be right out on the front lawn for everyone to see.

“Gatekeeper” is a term I really hate. It implies that someone is telling others what they are and are not allowed to enjoy. It is a necessary term though to properly describe what it is that a great producer and a great Carl Christmas do.

We don’t shut people out from being able to enjoy or be a part of what it is we are creating. We set or are handed down expectations and we block anything that can get in the way of achieving them. Sometimes, that is more thankless work than it should be. It is necessary though.

Kevin Anderson on Twitter: "Just noticed that I've been blocked by the  international civil aviation authority @icao Have others working on  aviation emissions also been blocked? Appears to be that their commitment

As my home’s self-appointed Carl Christmas and a former producer, let me give my countrymen the thanks others forget. We are the ones that make it possible for everyone else to be mindless. Wear it as a badge of honor. We may not get the kind of recognition we deserve everyday, but when plans go off without a hitch, we are usually the first to be recognized for making it happen.

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