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NBA’S Cruel Reality: A Shooting Trumps A Doncic Party

America’s latest police episode against a Black man has angry NBA players wondering why they’re still in the Bubble for games, a weight Luka Doncic can’t begin to lift despite his electric emergence.

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We have borrowed from Europe to make better automobiles, snazzier fashion and fruitier wine. So, we certainly can channel The Luka Doncic Experience to create a cooler NBA. His bullrush into the American sports consciousness has been as necessary as it is invigorating, allowing this distressed league to embrace an element — pause, cheer, revel — beyond an infectious disease and ongoing racial injustice horrors.

That element would be basketball. Remember the joy of ball?

It’s still difficult for LeBron James and the league’s players to embrace love for their game when hatred contaminates the world. In the country’s latest social fail, a 29-year-old Black man, Jacob Blake, was shot in the back several times from point-blank range by a white police officer in Kenosha, Wis., as Blake tried to enter his SUV in broad daylight with three of his children inside. Two NBA players, including playoff breakout star Donovan Mitchell, were so incensed by the shooting that they expressed regret the NBA relaunched its season in the Disney World Bubble.

They want justice, not basketball, to be the national priority.

They certainly aren’t wrong.

Milwaukee Bucks: George Hill talks NBA's return amid variety of issues

“We can’t do anything. First of all, we shouldn’t have came to this damn place, to be honest,’’ said George Hill of the Milwaukee Bucks, a franchise based 40 miles north of the shooting scene. “Coming here just took all the focal points off what the issues are. … We’re down here playing in the Bubble to do these things for social justice and all that, and to see it all still going on and we’re just playing the game like it’s nothing — it’s just a really messed-up situation right now.’’

As for the Bucks’ wavering title chances, Hill isn’t concerned: “Until the world gets their s—- together, I guess we’re not going to get our stuff together. Watching that stuff in Wisconsin really breaks my heart.’’     Tweeted Mitchell, who has led the Utah Jazz to a contender’s role in the Western Conference with prolific scoring outbursts: “F THE GAMES AND PLAYOFFS!!! THIS IS SICK AND IS A REAL PROBLEM WE DEMAND JUSTICE! ITS CRAZY I DONT HAVE ANY WORDS BUT WTF MAN! THIS IS WHY WE DONT FEEL SAFE!!!!

After watching the graphic footage in Kenosha, including fires burning into the night, James barely could control his anger. Any excitement about a dominant performance by the Lakers on Kobe Bryant Day — 8/24, the two numbers he wore during his legendary career — was blunted by the Blake shooting. He barely cared his team is up 3-1 over Portland in the first-round series. “I can’t even enjoy a playoff win right now, which is the sad part,’’ James said. “People get tired of hearing me say it, but we are scared as Black people in America. Black men, Black women, Black kids, we are terrified. Because you don’t know. You have no idea. You have no idea how that cop that day left the house. You don’t know if he woke up on the good side of the bed. You don’t know if he woke up on the wrong side of the bed. You don’t know if he had an argument at home with a significant other, if one of his kids said something crazy to him and he left the house steaming. Or maybe he just left the house saying today is going to be the end for one of these black people. That’s what it feels like.’’

The league knows it can’t separate the insignificance of games from another racial tragedy. An exodus of players from Orlando remains possible in that the postseason, still in the first round, won’t produce a champion at least early October. For now, the players are trying to do their jobs and maintain focus while obeying a schedule in a restrictive environment. In that context, Doncic’s breathtaking performances — including his game-winning three-pointer at the buzzer Sunday — provide at least a temporary escape from the cruel realities of Black America, the ceaseless pain.

Black people in America are scared,' says LeBron James after Jacob ...

Said James: “If you’re sitting here telling me that there was no way to subdue that gentleman or detain him before the firing of guns, then you’re sitting here and you’re lying to not only me, but you’re lying to every African American, every Black person in the community because we see it over and over and over. If you watch the video, there was multiple moments where if they wanted to, they could’ve tackled him. They could’ve grabbed him. Why does it always have to get to a point where we see the guns firing? His family is there, the kids are there, it’s in broad daylight. … It’s just, quite frankly, it’s just f—ked up in our community.’’

Yet only hours before, James was tweeting his admiration for Doncic like many NBA players, imitating announcer Mike Breen’s call of the final shot. “Sheesh. That’s ridiculous,’’ wrote Steph Curry, master of the dramatic.

Doncic has that effect on people. He is conjuring a brand of style and telepathy not previously seen in the sport, a hybrid already evolutionary before his 22nd birthday. How does one who’s built like a running back, thick and wide-shouldered at 230 pounds, operate with such finesse and dazzle, maneuvering and forcing through big-boy defenses and ignoring attempts to bruise and bait him? Why does he anticipate plays before everyone else on the court, as if dabbling in extrasensory perception or electronic sign-stealing? It’s cliche to call him a savant — the description is used for many when he is one of a kind — and rather than liken him to a particular legend, it’s more apt to compare his passing skills and vision to Larry Bird, his court awareness to James, his handle to Jason Kidd, his near-the-logo shooting range to Damian Lillard and his flair to Curry. Let’s avoid Michael Jordan analogies, please, but Doncic does wear his sneakers.

He also has the perfect nickname for a closer: The Don.

“He sees the game in 6G, not 5G — another level beyond what most people see,’’ said Rick Carlisle, who truly might be coaching the first wireless superstar with the Dallas Mavericks.

Luka Doncic | 2019-20 Season Highlights | NBA.com

Forget the dictum that even a phenom must learn to fail in the playoffs before he prevails. Doncic already has blasted through that wall with what Carlisle suggests was “maybe the greatest game played by a second-year player … a game from another planet.’’ The Mavericks can lose their first-round series against a title favorite, the Los Angeles Clippers, and The Don already has foot-printed an epic NBA memory: 43 points, 17 rebounds and 13 assists in Game 4, daggered by his artful step-back trey, joining Jordan — unavoidable, I guess — as the only players to nail win-or-lose shots to cap 40-point playoff performances. Jordan’s effort is known as The Shot.     The Don? He gave us The Hit … on Kobe Bryant’s birthday, no less.

“I was just trying to make it,’’ said Doncic, still humble as a hoops world stirs. “I can’t explain the emotions I had, not only when the ball goes in but when I see the whole team running toward me. That was something special. One of the best feelings I’ve ever had. Just something special.’’     Does he realize the magnitude of it all? “My feelings are not here right now,’’ he said. “I’ll think about it and let you know next time.”

Next time could be next game, for all we know. In a league historically defined by stylish, dominant personalities, Doncic arrives as a well-timed, unique conversation piece amid the fatigue of COVID-19 and the searing emotions of Black Lives Matter protests. He is not from Ohio, New York, California or anywhere in the U.S. Nor is he part of an African-American sector that comprises about 80 percent of NBA players. He hails from Slovenia, best known for mountains and forests and rivers, and he learned the game as a coach’s son. He’s hardly the first Europrodigy to crash the NBA scene, as he grew up watching Dirk Nowitzki, Tony Parker and the Brothers Gasol. But unlike past decades, when international hype often exceeded production and occasionally led to a Darko Milicic flop, Doncic soon will inherit a post-LeBron era when he and Giannis Antetokounmpo, the Greek Freak, are the league’s dominant players.

It’s not a stretch right now, given James’ self-mocked balding head and the inconsistent patterns of Antetokounmpo’s Bucks and Kawhi Leonard’s Clippers, that Doncic is emerging as the world’s best all-around player. It’s a refreshing, urgent breakout for a league facing a fraught financial future, including a TV ratings plunge that President Trump and his supporters attribute to an overemphasis on racial equality and Black Lives Matter crusades. No doubt segments of America are weary of sports activism, from James and Curry to prominent coaches such as Gregg Popovich and Steve Kerr. Yet James, Hill, Mitchell and other players and coaches had every right to vent publicly about the Kenosha shooting.

Khris Middleton Postgame Interview - Game 4 | Bucks vs Raptors ...

“At the end of the day, it’s up to our lawmakers, it’s up to our police department to stop shooting us. It’s that simple,’’ said the Bucks’ Khris Middleton. “They’re there to provide safety. There’s different ways to de-escalate situations than shooting someone, especially when running away or in the back.”

“It’s just sickening. It’s heartless,’’ Hill said. “It’s a f—ed-up situation. You’re supposed to look at the police to protect and serve. Now, it’s looked at harass or shoot.’’

Said Miami forward Bam Adebayo, after the Heat swept the Indiana Pacers: “Just seeing that video, it’s ridiculous. Someone has to be held accountable.’’

“Getting swept is tough, but at the end of the day, nobody’s dead,’’ said the Pacers’ Victor Oladipo. “People are dying. This is not OK.’’

In the larger vein of social justice, Doncic has earned the praise of his league brethren in more ways than one. During a Game 3 exchange, the Clippers’ Montrezl Harrell referred to Doncic as a “bitch ass white boy.’’ This could have been an explosive situation for NBA commissioner Adam Silver … except Doncic defused it by hugging Harrell and shaking his hand before Game 4, explaining to the media, “Sometimes you say things you don’t want to say. He apologized. So no problem.’’

Said Clippers coach Doc Rivers, marveling at Doncic’ poise during the flap: “`Luka, I guess, was shocked that he needed to reach out.’’

It’s possible no single gift from heaven can help the NBA, or America, at this stage of the racial quagmire. Having the Luka Doncic Experience is comforting, but neither his breakthrough nor Mamba’s Day can save the league from what ails a nation.

BSM Writers

Adam The Bull Is Giving Cleveland Something It’s Never Had Before

“It was only more recently that I was like why do I have to only be a radio guy?”

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After spending 22 years on the radio, Adam “The Bull” Gerstenhaber was ready for a new adventure.  In fact, the former co-host of Bull and Fox on 92.3 The Fan in Cleveland did not have a new job lined up when he signed off from his 11-year radio home last month.

“I was already leaving without having a new project,” admitted Gerstenhaber during a recent phone interview with BSM.  “I left before I knew for sure I had a ‘next project’.”

Gerstenhaber was preparing for his final show with co-host Dustin Fox on April 1st when he was contacted by an executive producer for TEGNA, a company that was developing a Cleveland sports television show on YouTube.  The executive producer, who had just found out that Bull was a free agent, made it clear that he wanted Bull to be a part of the new project.

It all came together very quickly. 

“Let’s talk on Monday,” Gerstenhaber told the executive producer. “And within a week they signed me up.”

The Ultimate Cleveland Sports Show on YouTube featuring Gerstenhaber, former ESPN personality Jay Crawford, 92.3 The Fan’s Garrett Bush, and rotating hosts to make up a four-person round-table show, made its debut last Monday.  The show, which airs weekdays from 11am to 1pm, features passionate Cleveland sports talk, live guests, either in-studio or via Zoom, as well as interaction from the audience through social media.

“I’m very excited,” said Gerstenhaber.  “It’s a definite adjustment for me after 22 years on radio doing television.  For the last 11 years, I’ve been doing a radio show with just one other host and I was the lead guy doing most of the talking and now I’m on a show with three other people and it’s such an adjustment.  So far, I’m having a ball.”  

And so far, the reaction to the show has been very positive.

A big reason why is that it’s something that Cleveland didn’t have and really never had, unlike a city like New York, where there are local radio shows that are simulcast on regional sports channels. 

“There’s nothing like that in Cleveland,” said Gerstenhaber.  “And there was certainly nothing like this with a panel.  Cleveland is such a massive sports town and now people that don’t live in Cleveland that are maybe retired in Florida or Arizona, now they actually have a TV show that they can watch that’s Cleveland-centric.”

The new venture certainly represents a big change in what Bull has been used to in his radio career.  He’s enjoying the freedom of not having to follow a hard clock for this show. In fact, there have already been some occasions where the show has been able to go a little longer than scheduled because they have the flexibility to do that on YouTube.

Doing a show on YouTube gives the panel a great opportunity to go deep into topics and spend some quality time with guests.  And while there is no cursing on the show at the moment, there could be the potential for that down the road.

Don’t expect the show is going to become X-rated or anything like that, but the objective is to be able to capture the spirit and emotion of being a sports fan and host.

“It’s something we may do in the future,” said Gerstenhaber.  “Not curse just to curse but it gives us the option if we get fired up.  It is allowed because there’s no restrictions there.  The company doesn’t want us to do it at the moment.”  

There’s also been the shift for Gerstenhaber from being the “point guard” on his old radio show, driving the conversation and doing most of the talking, to now taking a step back and having Crawford distributing the ball on the television show.

For a guy called “The Bull”, that will take some getting used to. 

“Jay is a pro’s pro,” said Gerstenhaber.  “He’s the point guard for this but he’s also part of the conversation.  I’m not used to not being the point guard so I have to adjust to that.  I think it’s gone pretty well and the chemistry is pretty good and with time we’ll get used to the flow of it.”  

Gerstenhaber’s move from sports radio to an internet television show is a perfect example of how the industry is changing.  A good portion of the listening and viewing audience these days, especially those in the younger demographic, are not necessarily watching traditional television or listening to terrestrial radio.  For a lot of sports fans, watching and listening on a mobile device or a computer has become a very important way of life.

The desire to adapt, along with a shorter workday, was very enticing to him.

“It was only more recently that I was like why do I have to only be a radio guy?” wondered Gerstenhaber.  “There were things about my job that I was unhappy about.  I was doing a five-hour radio show.  It’s too long. That’s crazy.  Nobody should be doing a five-hour radio show at this point.” 

Broadcasting on the internet has arrived and it’s not just a couple of sports fans doing a show from their garage anymore.  The business has evolved to the point where the technology has provided more opportunities for those who have already enjoyed success in the industry and are looking for new challenges.

Kind of like Adam The Bull!

“I think years ago, probably like many people in the radio business, we looked at internet and podcasts as like whatever…those guys aren’t professionals…they’re amateurs,” said Gerstenhaber.  “But the game has changed.”

Gerstenhaber, Crawford and everyone associated with the “Ultimate Cleveland Sports Show” should not have much of a problem attracting the younger audience. That demographic is already accustomed to watching shows on YouTube and other streaming platforms.  The challenge now is to get the more mature audience on board. There are certainly some obstacles there.

I know this from experience with trying to explain to my mother in Florida how she can hear me on the radio and watch me on television simply by using her tablet.

Bull can certainly relate to that.

“My mother is still trying to figure out how to watch the show live,” said Gerstenhaber with a chuckle.  “The older fans struggle with that. A lot of my older fans here in Cleveland are like how do I watch it? For people that are under 40 and certainly people that under 30, watching a YouTube show is like okay I watch everything on my phone or device.  It’s such a divide and obviously as the years go by, that group will increase.” 

With the television show off and running, Gerstenhaber still has a passion for his roots and that’s the radio side of the business.  In the next couple of weeks, “The Bull” is set to announce the launch of two podcasts, one daily and one weekly, that will begin next month.  But he also hasn’t ruled out the possibility of returning to terrestrial radio at some point.

“I have not closed the door to radio,” said Gerstenhaber.  “I still love radio.  I would still, in the right set of circumstances, consider going back to radio but it would have to really be the perfect situation.  I’m excited about (the television show) and right now I don’t want to do anything else but I’m certainly going to remain open-minded to radio if a really excellent opportunity came up.”

The landscape of the broadcasting industry, particularly when it comes to sports, has certainly changed over the years and continues to evolve.  Adam Gerstenhaber certainly enjoyed a tremendous amount of success on the radio side, both in New York and in Cleveland, but now he has made the transition to something new with the YouTube television show and he’s committed to making it a success.

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BSM Writers

Why You Should Be Making Great TikTok Content

“We’re specially trained in the world of TSL (time spent listening), and the longer people view your content on TikTok, the more the app rewards you by shoving your content into more and more feeds.”

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It feels like there’s a new social media platform to pay attention to every other week. That makes it easy to overlook when one of them actually presents value to your brand. It wasn’t long ago that TikTok was primarily used by teenagers with the focus being silly dance trends filmed for video consumption with their friends and followers alike. Now, as the general public has become in tune with how this complicated app works, it’s grown far beyond that.

TikTok is now an app used by all types of demographics and unlike TikTok’s closely related cousins Instagram and Facebook, this app provides a certain type of nuance that I think people in our line of work can really excel in. 

Before I get into the nuts and bolts of how you can use TikTok to your advantage and how to make your videos catch on, I think it’s important to first mention why this matters for you. Now, if I’m being realistic, I’m sure there are some that have already stopped reading this or those that could scroll away fast enough when they saw the words TikTok. You might be thinking that this doesn’t fit your demo, or maybe that it’s a waste of time because productivity here won’t directly lead to an uptick in Nielsen ratings. But I’m not sure any social network directly leads to what we ultimately get judged on, and we aren’t always pumping out content directly to our core audience.

TikTok, like any other app you may use, is marketing. This is another free tool to let people out there know who you are and what you offer in this endless sea of content. And the beauty of TikTok is that it directly caters its algorithm to content creators just like us. Bottom line, if you are a personality in sports talk, there’s no reason you can’t be crushing it on TikTok right now. All it takes is a little direction, focus, consistency, and a plan. 

Unlike Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter where you can throw a photo up with a caption and be done for the day, TikTok’s whole model is built on creative videos that keep users engaged for longer periods of time. This approach works. According to Oberlo, a social media stat tracking site, people spend more time per day on TikTok than any other popular social media application. 38 minutes per day!

This is where this is good news for us in talk radio. We’re specially trained in the world of TSL (time spent listening), and the longer people view your content on TikTok, the more the app rewards you by shoving your content into more and more feeds. TikTok’s algorithm doesn’t care how many followers you have, your level of credibility, or the production on your video. All ir cares about is 1) Is your content good. and 2) Are people watching it. 3) How long are they watching it. The more people watch and the longer they watch creates a snowball effect. Your videos views will skyrocket, sometimes within hours. 

So, how do you create content that will catch on? It’s really not all that different than what you do every day. Create thought-provoking commentary that makes people think, argue, or stay till the end to get the info you teased up for them. I’ve found through my own trial and error that it’s best if you stay away from time-sensitive material, I’ve had more success the more evergreen my content is. That way, the shelf life expands beyond just that day or week. This is different for everyone and there’s no one-size-fits-all, but this is where I’ve seen the most success. 

Also, put yourself out there, don’t be afraid to say something that people are going to vehemently disagree with. Again, it’s not unlike what we do every day. It’s one thing to get someone to listen, it’s another to get them to engage. Once they hit you in the comment section, you’ve got them hooked. Comments breed more views and on and on. But don’t just let those sit there, even the smallest interaction back like a shoulder shrug emoji can go a long way in creating more play for your video. 

If you want to grow quickly, create a niche for yourself. The best content creators that I follow on TikTok all put out very similar content for most of their videos. This means, unlike Instagram where it’s great to show what a wildly interesting and eclectic person you are, TikTok users want to know what they’re getting the second your face pops up on that screen. So if you are the sports history guy, be the sports history guy all the time. If you are the top 5 list guy, be the top 5 list guy all the time, and on and on, you get the point. 

Other simple tricks

  • Splice small videos together. Don’t shoot one long video. 
  • 90 seconds to 2 minutes is a sweet spot amount of time. 
  • Add a soft layer of background instrumental music (this feature is found in the app when you are putting the finishing touches on your video) 
  • Label your video across the screen at the start and time it out so that it disappears seconds later. This way a user gets an idea of what the content is immediately and then can focus on you delivering your message thereafter.  
  • Research trending hashtags, they are far more important than whatever you caption your video. 
  • Use closed captions so that people can follow your video without sound. 

Finally, don’t be intimidated by it or snub your nose at it. Anything that helps your brand is worth doing and anything worth doing is worth doing well. 

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BSM Writers

Does Tom Brady’s Salary Make Sense For FOX In a Changing Media World?

“The risk here doesn’t have to do with Brady specifically, but rather the business of televising football games in general.”

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FOX is playing it too safe when it comes to adding Tom Brady.

That’s going to sound weird given the size of Brady’s broadcasting contract. Even if that deal isn’t worth as much as initially reported, it’s a hell of a lot of loot, especially considering Brady has remained steadfastly uninteresting for a solid 20 years now.

Let’s not pretend that is a detriment in the eyes of a television network, however. There’s a long line of famous athletes companies like FOX have happily paid millions without ever requiring them to be much more than consistently inoffensive and occasionally insightful. Yes, Brady is getting more money than those previous guys, but he’s also the most successful quarterback in NFL history.

The risk here doesn’t have to do with Brady specifically, but rather the business of televising football games in general. More specifically, the fact that the business of televising football games is changing, and while it may not be changing quite as rapidly as the rest of the sports-media industry, but it is changing. There’s an increasing number of choices available to viewers not only in the games that can be watched, but how they are consumed. Everything in the industry points to an increasingly fragmented audience and yet by signing Brady to be in the broadcast booth once he retires, FOX is paying a premium for a single component in a tried-and-true broadcasting formula will be more successful. 

Think of Brady’s hiring as a bet FOX made. A 10-year commitment in which it is doubling down on the status quo at a time of obvious change. FOX saw ESPN introduce the ManningCast last year, and instead of seeing the potential for a network to build different types of products, FOX decided, “Nah, we don’t want to do anything different or new.” Don’t let the price tag fool you. FOX went out and bought a really famous former player to put in a traditional broadcast booth to hope that the center holds..

Maybe it will. Maybe Brady is that interesting or he’s that famous and his presence is powerful enough to defy the trends within the industry. I’m not naive enough to think that value depends on the quality of someone’s content. The memoir of a former U.S. president will fetch a multi-million-dollar advance not because of the literary quality, but because of the size of the potential audience. It’s the same rationale behind FOX’s addition of Brady.

But don’t mistake an expensive addition from an innovative one. The ManningCast was an actual innovation. A totally different way of televising a football game, and while not everyone liked it, some people absolutely loved it. It’s not going to replace the regular Monday Night Football format, but it wasn’t supposed to. It’s an alternative or more likely a complement and ESPN was sufficiently encouraged to extend the ManningCast through 2024. It’s a different product. Another option it is offering its customers. You can choose to watch to the traditional broadcast format with Joe Buck and Troy Aikman in the booth or you can watch the Mannings or you can toggle between both. What’s FOX’s option for those audience members who prefer something like the ManningCast to the traditional broadcast?

It’s not just ESPN, either. Amazon offered viewers a choice of broadcasters, too, from a female announcing tandem of Hannah Storm and Andrea Kramer beginning in 2018 to the Scouts Feed with Daniel Jeremiah and Bucky Brooks in 2020.

So now, not only do viewers have an increasingly wide array of choices on which NFL games they can watch — thanks to Sunday Ticket — they in some instances have a choice of the announcing crew for that given game. Amid this economic environment, FOX not only decided that it was best to invest in a single product, but it decided to make that investment in a guy who had never done this particular job before nor shown much in the way of an aptitude for it.

Again, maybe Brady is the guy to pull it off. He’s certainly famous enough. His seven Super Bowl victories are unmatched and span two franchises, and while he’s denied most attempts to be anything approaching interesting in public over the past 20 years, perhaps that is changing. His increasingly amusing Twitter posts over the past 2 years could be a hint of the humor he’s going to bring to the broadcast booth. That Tampa Tom is his true personality, which remained under a gag order from the Sith Lord Bill Belichick, and now Brady will suddenly become football’s equivalent of Charles Barkley.

But that’s a hell of a needle to thread for anyone, even someone as famous as Brady, and it’s a really high bar for someone with no broadcasting experience. The upside for FOX is that its traditional approach holds. The downside, however, is that it is not only spending more money on a product with a declining market, but it is ignoring obvious trends within the industry as it does so.

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