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White Privilege? Stephen A. Smith Owes Steve Nash A Direct Apology

Stephen A. Smith erroneously said Blacks don’t receive NBA head-coaching jobs without previous experience, as Steve Nash did, then doubled down as executives from left-leaning ESPN sat still in a racially torn America.

Jay Mariotti

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There are times, admittedly, when I feel sorry for ESPN as it slogs into a muddled future, rationalizes its plight with faux self-importance and leans so far left politically that no chiropractor can fix its crooked spine. Maybe Nielsen’s expanded metrics system, measuring “out of home’’ viewership for the first time, will be a ratings game-changer for live events and studio shows. But this is not a time for sympathy or hope.

Today, I am disgusted with the place.

Never has it entered my brainstream to make this type of remark: “The only reason (a team) hired (a coach) is because he’s Black.’’ During my eight years as a panelist on ESPN’s “Around The Horn,’’ such a flagrantly racist comment never would have made it to air. The producers would have halted the taping. I’d have been sent home and told never to return. And, of course, I would have deserved the entirety of professional punishment and accompanying public shame.

But the people who run the company and control the editorial product — Bob Iger, Jimmy Pitaro, Norby Williamson — are drowning these days in hypocrisy disguised as social awareness. They want equality, right? Then they should embrace equality for all races instead of allowing a Black network personality, the ubiquitous Stephen A. Smith, to say Steve Nash was hired to coach the Brooklyn Nets only because he is White.

“Ladies and gentlemen, there’s no way around this. This is white privilege. This does not happen for a Black man,’’ Smith said on “First Take,’’ his weekday TV program. “No experience whatsoever? On any level as a coach? And you get the Brooklyn Nets job?”

Ladies and gentlemen, there’s no way around this. This is convenient bigotry, race-baiting and truth-twisting of the worst kind. At a time when broadcast networks allow Black commentators to stoke the searing flames of racism without accountability or consequence, Smith was permitted to express a sweeping, headline-grabbing, social-media-inciting take without considering facts or circumstances. As one who has supported him in the past, I might wonder if it’s another example of his being overworked by a network that can’t get enough of him on its platforms. But this time, his lapse is too reckless and damaging to be pardoned.

When Smith says “this does not happen for a Black man,’’ he’s claiming that a White NBA great is being gifted an undeserving opportunity as a neophyte — Nash has no previous head-coaching experience — when such a raw chance never would be accorded a Black man in the league. Wrong. Wrong as one can be.

See Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers, 1994.

See Doc Rivers, Orlando Magic, 1999.

See Isiah Thomas, Indiana Pacers, 2000.

See Mark Jackson, Golden State Warriors, 2011.

See Jason Kidd, Nets, 2013.

See Derek Fisher, New York Knicks, 2014.

Also see Tyronn Lue, Cleveland Cavaliers, 2016, who was a career assistant when summoned in midseason to replace a White head coach, David Blatt, a move that ended with LeBron James celebrating a historic Finals triumph over the Warriors.

In fact, in a list compiled by NBC Sports, nine of the last 16 NBA head coaches hired with no previous coaching experience have been Black. Does Smith realize that the last three coaches to win championships — Lue, Golden State’s Steve Kerr and Toronto’s Nick Nurse — were hired without NBA head-coaching experience? That the Nets have employed eight Black head coaches since 1989? Would you like to do research, Stephen A., before exacerbating the tempest of racial relations in a divided America? And would ESPN like to make a statement about on-air credibility by at least reprimanding Smith and showing that the network actually cares about the veracity of its content? Nah, the aforementioned executives lack the requisite political testicles, already driving on the shoulder of the left lane when the center lane always makes the most sense in sports TV.

During his incendiary fit, Smith should have known the hire was directly attached to Nash’s close working relationship with Nets superstar Kevin Durant, who is Black. Nash’s individual workout sessions with Durant were essential during their time together with Golden State, where Nash served as a player development consultant for five years. They traded trash-talk out of mutual reverence, a Hall of Famer and two-time league MVP trying to maximize the monstrous skills of a future Hall of Famer, compelling Durant to tell reporters in 2018, “He’s someone I can talk to about anything and somebody I really respect. His basketball mind is probably the best I’ve been around. He tries to simplify the game and keep me conscious of those things as well. It’s simplifying and keeping it easy for yourself. I’ve learned so much. So many people taught me how to play. He’s continued to teach me different things I can put in my game. I’m very grateful for him.”

When Nets owner Joe Tsai and general manager Sean Marks sought a head coach, guess whose voice in the organization weighed paramount? Durant’s voice, in concert with teammate Kyrie Irving’s voice. As a tag team, they signed lucrative contracts with the Nets last year knowing they’d influence coaching and roster decisions. It’s well worth emphasizing that Durant and Irving, both given to robust activism during their careers, didn’t let race interfere with the head coach they desired. If Smith knows anything about the NBA — and he has covered the league for decades — he’d have realized the strong links between Nash, Durant and Marks, who played with Nash in Phoenix and became a close friend. He also would have considered how Nash has rejected other coaching and front-office offers through the years, preoccupied with his GM duties for Canada’s national team, his Warriors role and Hollywood production interests. Plus, given Nash’s time with Golden State, who wouldn’t want to channel the culture of Kerr, whose teams only won three championships and went to five straight league Finals?

But Smith saw only one thing: a white face. And he wondered why Nash was appointed when seasoned Black coaches such as Lue and Jackson were available. So, this somehow became a case of “White privilege’’ when the facts scream otherwise. If we must go down White/Black separation highway — for the record, I’d much prefer we all got along in this world as equals — first-time White NBA head coaches such as Kerr, Nurse and even Larry Bird in the wayback machine all have fared quite well. And just as Rivers has enjoyed a stellar coaching career that might end with another league title, in the Disney World Bubble with the L.A. Clippers, most Black coaches on the neophyte list have not succeeded. I don’t draw much from such data, but I thought Stephen A. might want to deal in a few facts.

If the conversation never should “stick to sports,’’ especially in 2020, what sports can do in such cases is try color blindness. And maybe give Nash credit for being anything but another accomplished White guy getting a cushy break. He has paid a measure of coaching dues working for the Warriors and helping not only Durant but Steph Curry. Also, Smith might be surprised that Nash has used George Floyd as his Twitter profile picture since that horrific day in May, when Floyd was choked to death by a White police officer in Minneapolis.

Steve Nash will use his voice as Nets coach: 'It's important to support  this fight'

“As a human being, it’s hard to live with racial injustice,” Nash told The Undefeated’s Marc Spears, a more responsible ESPN-employed voice in this instance than Smith. “It’s important for white people to take a deep look at what is occurring in our communities and what has been occurring for 400 years. A component of this conversation needs to be that white people need to not be offensive about white privilege or inequality. They just need to be honest, have those conversations and ask ourselves how we would feel if we had endured this 400-plus-year history. So, for me, it’s hurtful and it’s wrong. That’s why I have expressed my opinion on the matters because some of us are hurting and it’s not fair.”

It’s not as if the Nets didn’t consider Black candidates, such as interim head coach Jacque Vaughn, who will remain in Brooklyn as the league’s highest-paid assistant and would have been named permanent head coach had Nash rejected the Nets’ overtures. Vaughn, by the way, went 58-158 in 2 1/2 seasons as a head coach in Orlando. In a market where the dominant status of the dysfunctional Knicks never has been more vulnerable, the Nets went for the newsier hire. It’s a big story in New York, Nash coaching Durant and Irving; Lue or Vaughn coaching them is not a huge story, nor is it a huge story that retread Tom Thibodeau was hired by the Knicks. “After meeting with a number of highly accomplished coaching candidates from diverse backgrounds, we knew we had a difficult decision to make,” Marks said. “In Steve, we see a leader, communicator and mentor who will garner the respect of our players. I have had the privilege to know Steve for many years. One of the great on-court leaders in our game, I’ve witnessed firsthand his basketball acumen and selfless approach to prioritize team success. His instincts for the game, combined with an inherent ability to communicate with and unite players towards a common goal, will prepare us to compete at the highest levels of the league.”

I am not alone in admonishing Smith. “I was very disappointed in some of the guys talking about White privilege,” Charles Barkley said on TNT. “They’re like, `Well, this doesn’t happen to Black guys.’ And I’m like, `It happened to Doc Rivers. It happened to Jason Kidd. It happened to Derek Fisher.’ When you have a responsibility, especially when you have to talk about something as serious as race, you can’t be full of crap. You’ve got to be honest and fair. Steve Nash is a great player and a good dude. … Now, do we need more Black coaches in the NBA? Yes. Do we need more Black coaches in college football? Yes. Do we need more Black coaches in pro football? Yes. But this wasn’t the right time to say that today. Good luck to Steve Nash.”

Even Smith’s ESPN teammate, Jay Williams, fired back on Twitter: “Come on SA. Steve Nash being chosen over Mark Jackson/Ty Lue is not “White Privilege”.. 2 superstar black athletes ultimately made the decision & we know who they are and what they are about.”

At a time when people see color, count faces and point fingers, four Black NBA head coaches have lost gigs this season: Vaughn, Indiana’s Nate McMillan, New Orleans’ Alvin Gentry and the Knicks’ David Fizdale. In a 30-team league in which about 80 percent of the players are Black, there are seven head coaches of color — five are Black, Miami’s Erik Spoelstra is of Filipino descent, and Charlotte’s James Borrego is Hispanic. The number has slipped from the 14 minority head coaches during the 2012-13 season, meaning the four teams with vacancies will have pressure to hire Black coaches, with New Orleans and Philadelphia — which fired Brett Brown, who is White — interested in Lue. Most owners and general managers are not looking at race, not in the NBA. They would kill to find the next Rivers, so vital to the Clippers as a coach and to the league as a transcendent leader. Is it a problem that more Black assistants don’t get opportunities? Yes — and the Clippers’ Sam Cassell is among those who deserve shots right now. But unlike Magic Johnson in the ‘90s — a head-coaching hire comparable to the Nash appointment — there aren’t many retired Black superstars who want to coach in the league.

Chauncey Billups on Warriors being named 'coma' lineup: Are y'all kidding  me? | NBA Countdown | ESPN - YouTube

Chauncey Billups would be a natural, but he has aspirations to run a basketball operation. Juwan Howard, who would be in demand, prefers to stay at the University of Michigan for now, while Patrick Ewing is proving himself at Georgetown. Look, teams want a coach who can win and excite the fans, challenges more important than ever when the coronavirus could keep paying customers out of arenas well into 2021, or longer.

Not that Stephen A. Smith ever would apologize for swinging and missing badly. Acknowledging an egregious mistake would ruin his shtick. The next day, decibels rising again, he refused to back down: “I mentioned `white privilege’ yesterday. I have a message to those who feel I was wrong, that i need to apologize, that I don’t know what I’m talking about: I don’t give a damn what y’all feel. Y’all can kick rocks. I don’t give a damn. I’m not budging from my position one inch. I called it `white privilege’ yesterday. I’m calling it today. I’m calling it `white privilege’ a month from now, a year from now, five years from now.’’

Even when, in this case, it’s utter foolishness to say it. Smith should apologize directly to Nash. And the apology should be televised because, after all, the reason he’s on the air so much is so ESPN can squeeze him for all the attention his act can muster. Never mind that his subject matter is dangerous and flammable and filled with the hatred that makes America a sick place. Ratings are ratings!

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NBA Basketball Media Continues to Pile On The Boston Celtics

These Celtics have yet to win a ring and that is on them, but the media criticism levied against them has been inane.

John Molori

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Logo for the Boston Celtics and screengrabs from ESPN
Screengrabs from ESPN's First Take and Get Up

They are the most unfairly criticized team in the NBA, a team that cruised to 64 victories and earned the number one seed in a very tough Eastern Conference. They have taken two NBA playoff series in five games respectively and lead the Eastern Conference Finals 2-0 versus Indiana.

I speak of the Boston Celtics, and despite these sterling facts, their two superstars, Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown and the team as a whole, continue to garner criticism from the roundball media.

These “experts” say that the Celtics cannot be trusted and that they have not played to their potential. The Celtics have been to the Eastern Conference Finals six times since 2017 and made it to the NBA Finals in 2022, losing to the Golden State Warriors, but to listen to the basketball cognoscenti, you would think they are a bunch of green-clad slugs.

I get it, the Tatum-Brown Celtics have yet to win an NBA Championship, and I agree that if they don’t win it all this year, it will be a failed season for sure. After Boston defeated Cleveland in the Eastern semifinals, TNT analyst Draymond Green stated that no one cares that the Celtics once again made it to the conference finals. He is 100% correct, but that does not mean that the Celtics are utter garbage.

It’s really hard to win an NBA playoff series in five games. The Celtics have already done that twice in these playoffs, but instead of giving the Celtics credit for taking care of business, many commentators have denigrated them for how they are winning and the teams they have faced or did not have to face.

Joel Embiid was hurt. Giannis Antetokounmpo was hurt. The Knicks were banged up and the Cavs lost Donovan Mitchell. Well, too bad. Injuries are a part of the game. Are we forgetting the Celtics have been crushing playoff series without Kristaps Porzingis? When the Celtics get attention from the national media spotlight, it is usually with an air of disappointment and disgust. I’m wondering why.

ESPN and FS1 give endless attention, hope, positivity, and forward-thinking to the Los Angeles Lakers. Simply put, the Lakers are a mediocre to decent basketball team at best. They were dumped in the first round of the playoffs and if not for their history, LeBron James, and the city in which they play, they wouldn’t even be in the discussion. They are the New Orleans Pelicans with Snoop Dogg at courtside.

Still, the Lakers remain in the A block on many network hoops shows. Do you want to talk about a lack of trust, disappointment, and not reaching potential? How about the defending champion Denver Nuggets?

Yes, they have a two-time MVP in Nikola Jokic, but what about his team this year? They fell to a bunch of playoff neophytes called the Minnesota Timberwolves, losing Game 7 at home. Meanwhile, the Celtics took out an always tough Miami Heat team and a highly competitive Cavaliers team, 5 games each. All these Celtics do is win. Does it matter if the wins are pretty? Since when is that the media litmus test?

In a recap of Game 1 of the Eastern finals, a thrilling 133-128 overtime win for Boston, ESPN’s Tim Bontemps said that the Celtics almost “coughed up” another game at home. He went on to say that all the Pacers had to do was inbound the ball and hit a free-throw, and they would have won. Fine Tim, but guess what? They didn’t get it done and the Celtics did. Mistakes and capitalizing on mistakes are a big part of basketball.

Bontemps went on to say that if the Celtics don’t win Game 2 vs. Indiana, the Game 1 win will not matter. This is quite possibly the most foolhardy statement uttered in this year’s NBA playoffs. When four games win a series, every win matters. I understand that the Celtics lost Game 2 at home in their first two series, but so what? They righted the ship and swept both series the rest of the way.

During Game 1 against the Pacers, the Celtics jumped out to an early double-digit lead, but Indy came back to tie the game as good NBA playoff teams are known to do. ESPN’s Lisa Salters asked Boston guard Jrue Holiday how the Celtics lost the early lead. Holiday calmly replied that the Pacers are an NBA team as well. Exactly.

At the end of Game 1, after Boston stormed back in regulation and dominated the OT, ESPN play by play announcer Mike Breen said that the Celtics “survived” Game 1. It was an interesting choice of words that underlined the unfair criticism of Boston.

Coming back in a game, hitting big shots, and winning when it matters is not surviving. It is stepping up, closing the door, and being clutch. Breen is probably unfamiliar with these words because he’s been hanging around the Knicks too long.

On the May 21 edition of ESPN’s First Take, the talented and eloquent Andraya Carter questioned whether the Celtics can be trusted pinpointing Jayson Tatum in the conversation. Austin Rivers vehemently disagreed and the two engaged in a lively debate. The morning after the Celtics won Game 1 vs. the Pacers, ESPN’s Get Up crew still dogged them.

The eminent host Mike Greenberg asked the panel how Jaylen Brown could get open for the “easiest” three-point shot of the game to tie the game with just seconds left in regulation.

If you watch video of the shot, however, it was hardly easy. Brown was in the far corner with the 6-10 Pascal Siakam in his face and the Indiana bench just a couple of feet away most likely yelling Dicemanesque obscenities his way. These are the types of unmerited insults tossed at the Celtics. Brown hits an amazing shot with everything on the line and it is somehow considered the easiest shot of the game. Really?

Much of the rancor toward the Celtics is based on their stacked roster and the perceived lack of talent in their opponents, but let me get all historical on you for a minute. The nearly unanimously coronated greatest player in the history of the game, Michael Jordan, did not play all-time great teams in winning his six NBA Championship series.

In 1991, it was an old Lakers team. In 1992, it was the utterly forgettable Portland Trailblazers. In 1993, it was an aging Phoenix Suns team with Charles Barkley trying to get a

ring. In 1996, it was a good, but not great Seattle Sonics club, and in 1997 and 1998, it was the Utah Jazz. I’ll give the Jazz Karl Malone and John Stockton, but the rest of the team did double duty in a men’s weeknight league at the Northern Utah YMCA.

In fact, a team’s competition is trivial. If you win, you win. It doesn’t matter who is on the opposite side of the court. The Celtics have yet to win a ring and that is on them, but the media criticism levied against them has been inane.

Even the legendary Michael Wilbon piled on saying that if the Knicks were completely healthy, he would have picked them to beat the Celtics. All due respect to Mr. Wilbon, but a fully healthy Knicks team still may not have beaten the Pacers, sharpshooting like Martin Riggs in Lethal Weapon.

On Get Up this past week, ESPN’s Alan Hahn said that Jayson Tatum is not in the same league as LeBron James. No kidding, Alan. LeBron James is the leading scorer in NBA history, a man who has defined the sport for two decades. Hahn doubled down however, stating that Tatum is not in the same league as Luka Doncic.

Doncic is an immensely skillful player, but that’s about it. His Mavericks are in the conference finals for only the second time in his career. He has taken his team absolutely nowhere. Doncic is the is the Josh Allen of the NBA. Super stats, but not a sniff of a conference championship to his credit. His name is Luca, and he lives on the second bill to Tatum.

On the May 22 edition of First Take, Stephen A. Smith noted that Jayson Tatum scored 12 points in the Game 1 overtime period, but also added that Tatum shot 2-10 in the fourth quarter and early in overtime.

Fair enough, but he then stated, “You’re looking for him, and he was nowhere to be found when it really counted.” Huh? So, it didn’t really count in overtime? Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals between the Celtics and the Pacers was a tremendous NBA playoff game, one that should go down in history as a classic.

Instead, it became a springboard for continued unfounded Celtics trashing. Not every competitive NBA game is perfect. Teams make mistakes and miss shots. That’s basketball.

Game 2 saw the Celtics drub the Pacers 126-110 making them 10-2 in the playoffs with multiple trustworthy players delivering in the clutch. This series might end in 4 or 5 games, or could go 7, but to once again paraphrase Draymond Green, nobody cares as long as you win. Despite the baseless media negativity, that is exactly what the Celtics have been doing.

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Ken LaVicka Looks Ahead Following ESPN West Palm Exit

“The last thing I wanted to do was bus throw.”

Derek Futterman

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Ken LaVicka
Courtesy: ESPN West Palm

Although April Fool’s Day had recently taken place, the message Ken LaVicka was delivering on the air early in the month was hardly a joking matter. In an announcement that came as a shock to listeners and LaVicka himself, he revealed that he was leaving ESPN West Palm after 17 years with the outlet. For the last three years, he was the co-host of the popular LaVicka, Theo and Stone midday program, which provided local listeners with discussion and revelry surrounding sports in South Florida and in the United States as a whole.

While it was insinuated to LaVicka that there were financial reasons for the exit, the entire move left him uneasy and uncomfortable, suddenly finding himself out of regular hosting work and looking for a new job. After all, he had been appearing on the air for the Good Karma Brands-owned radio station since 2007, one year after he completed college at Valparaiso University. Over the years at the outlet, he augmented his standing through shifts as an update anchor and fill-in host to eventually being granted his own full-time hosting slot.

The audience within the West Palm Beach and Treasure Coast marketplace had become accustomed to his voice and opinions for more than a decade, making the move difficult for both parties involved. In fact, as LaVicka was divulging the news in the last 20 minutes of what was his final show on the station, he articulated that it was not only he and his partners losing the midday show, but those listeners that encompass the audience as well.

“It was ultimately a corporate decision,” LaVicka said. “It was definitely not mutual. I would prefer to still be at ESPN West Palm. I am unhappy that I’m not at ESPN West Palm, but hey, we’ve been in the business a long time. I’ve seen a lot of friends end up losing jobs over decisions that come from a much higher paygrade, and so I think that ultimately that’s what happened to me.”

When reflecting back on the circumstances that led to his departure from the station, LaVicka believes that he was seen as expendable. Outside of his hosting work, LaVicka is a play-by-play announcer for Florida Atlantic University and calls NWSL soccer matches on various digital platforms. Although LaVicka is appreciative of the company’s belief for him to find his footing again, he is crestfallen to be off the air but conducted himself with professionalism throughout his egress.

“The last thing I wanted to do was bus throw,” LaVicka said. “Was I disappointed? Absolutely. Was I bitter? For sure, and I still feel bitterness towards the situation that unfolded. But I also think that the positives of the opportunities afforded to me by Good Karma Brands for almost 20 years, and also at the end them trying to, while making a tough decision that was going to have an adverse effect on me, try and do it in the most professional and classy way possible that you could in that spot, it kind of allowed me this freedom.”

There exists a dichotomy between LaVicka’s time at ESPN West Palm ending and that of the midday program itself. Upon discovering that he would not be retained, he made this distinction and felt despondency towards having to leave his co-hosts Theo Dorsey and Stone Labanowitz. The broad age cohort on the program and varying perspectives on sports was an aspect that LaVicka believes engendered a unique offering on the air. LaVica has been at the station the longest among the trio, and his partners understood the importance of having the ability to say goodbye to the listeners through the platform.

LaVicka remembers starting at the outlet and describes the first office he worked out of as an “absolute closet,” but it proved to be a place where the business continued to flourish. Originally being from Chicago, Ill., he adjusted to living in southern Florida while also having an ability to focus on growing his career.

The perception that he had of sports talk radio when he was studying in college and participating in the student-run radio station differed from what he ultimately experienced working at ESPN West Palm. It was preceded by a year working at then-FOX Sports 100.5 FM in Madison, Wisc., also owned by Good Karma Brands. LaVicka accepted the role three days before he was supposed to move to Dickinson, N.D. to work as a sportswriter for The Dickinson Press, deciding to pursue his passion in radio.

Nearly two decades later, he evinces an ongoing, axiomatic shift pertaining to multimedia consumption and content creation. LaVicka believes it has become more difficult for terrestrial radio outlets to find businesses who want to associate with their work and delivery methods, although it is dependent on the marketplace. The apprehension he possesses in this regard, however, is in whether talented young people will be able to secure and subsequently capitalize off opportunities.

“Local radio will not die,” LaVicka prognosticated. “It’s still too much of a bonding entity for it to go away completely, but the expectations of how much money a local station can bring in just using traditional means as its way of bringing in income – there’s going to have to be some forward thinkers in that local radio space because you can’t just go, ‘The person goes on air – sell sponsorships’ It doesn’t work like that anymore.”

LaVicka himself is currently looking for a new role in the industry and is not opposed to moving out of south Florida if the opportunity is right for him and his family. Since losing his job at ESPN West Palm, he has endured many sleepless nights and pondered over the amount of fortitude and patience he has within the process.

Even though he is not ruling out an eventual return to ESPN West Palm, he views the outcome as unlikely. The value working there, however, comes in being able to relate and appeal to a diverse, transient audience residing within the locale. Good Karma Brands is assisting him with the process by promoting his work and providing him with financial assistance as he prepares for his next career move.

“I don’t want to come off as cocky, but I’m very confident in myself that given an opportunity; given a role – a sizable role that is something that’s going to be consumed by a lot of people – I get that opportunity, I’m going to excel in it,” LaVicka said. “There hasn’t been any point in my career on air where I haven’t been given an opportunity and then it didn’t completely expand past I think what the initial expectation was, and this includes my time at Florida Atlantic.”

While LaVicka is open to opportunities in terrestrial radio, he is also exploring working in the digital realm and recently started a YouTube show with WQAM digital content producer Zach Krantz titled By All Accounts. LaVicka first met Krantz at Miami Dolphins practices and training camps when he was working on The Joe Rose Show, and they shared several laughs and memorable moments.

When LaVicka and his wife welcomed their second child into the world, it required a stint in the neonatal intensive care unit at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital in Hollywood, Fla. Their newborn daughter ended up spending 72 hours there where her health improved. Krantz discovered the circumstance shortly after it began and reached out to LaVicka to offer his support, understanding the stress with the situation after his son was in the NICU for several months.

“[He] made sure to come find me at the hospital and put me at ease [and] talked me through the process,” LaVicka said, “and that was massively important to me, had a major effect on me and also gave me an idea of the type of person Zach Krantz is.”

Krantz came up with the idea to start a program with LaVicka, reaching out to him shortly after his exit from ESPN West Palm. Within his proposition, he explained that they already possessed strong chemistry and rapport and would work together to begin a show from phase one. Despite the program still being in its early stages, LaVicka can sense palpable growth potential that could perhaps turn into its own sustainable entity if it continues to grow. The venture is not evanescent, but rather something he is committed to growing in the long run as he discovers the media landscape and searches for the most optimal long-term solution.

“I want this thing to be broad,” LaVicka said. “I want it to be fun, but I think that I also want to make sure that it at least plays to our strengths, which is being petty sports fans; which is showing favor to South Florida sports, making sure that we’re being extremely relatable in the grand scheme of things.”

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How Advertisers Can Protect Their Digital Ad Spend

Invalid website traffic from automated scripts and “bad bots” will waste $71 billion this year.

Jeff Caves

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Graphic for digital advertising

Small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) partnering with digital marketing companies for their ad spend can enjoy significant advantages. Digital companies, such as many radio stations’ digital departments, often have more expertise than SMBs in spending money wisely to generate website traffic and, crucially, in avoiding the waste of ad dollars on fake traffic. Fake website traffic has increased by 33% in just two years. Invalid website traffic (IVT) from automated scripts and “bad bots” will waste $71 billion this year. Here are some questions advertisers can ask their digital partner to help eliminate fake ad engagement:

Make Data and Machines Work

Ask your digital partner if they use advanced data analytics and machine learning to optimize your ad spend. By employing predictive analytics—predicting future outcomes—savvy digital marketers can identify audiences most likely to engage genuinely with your ads. Inquire if they use Google Analytics and how it can help flag potential fraud and protect your investment.

Blockchain Technology for Ad Verification

To ensure transparency and security in your ad campaigns, some digital marketers leverage blockchain technology. This technology records every click and impression, guaranteeing that each interaction is genuine and that payments are made only for verified interactions. Blockchain makes it more difficult to change, hack, or manipulate data.

Advanced Attribution Models

Check if your partner uses multi-touch attribution models, which consider all touchpoints in the customer’s journey to your website. This approach provides a comprehensive view of how each ad contributes to conversions. Algorithmic attribution models apply sophisticated algorithms to improve ROI measurement.

Partnerships with Anti-Fraud Organizations

Ask if they collaborate with anti-fraud organizations to reduce fraud in digital advertising. Some digital companies ensure that campaigns and partners are certified by organizations like TAG, guaranteeing that ad placements are genuine and not plagued with fake engagements.

Private Marketplaces

Ensure that ad placements are with trusted publishers, reducing the risk of fraud. Some digital companies use private marketplaces, where a limited number of advertisers can buy and access premium inventory that is less susceptible to fraud, ensuring higher-quality ad placements for your business.

Real-Time Bidding (RTB) and Enhanced Filters

Your digital partner should set criteria for real-time bidding to ensure only high-quality, vetted traffic is considered. Real-Time Bidding is an auction setting where ad impressions are sold and bought. And transactions occur within seconds. Once an advertiser’s bid wins the auction, their digital ad is instantaneously shown on the website or property of the publisher.

Dynamic bidding strategies can adjust in real time based on the quality and performance of the inventory, maximizing the efficiency of your ad spend. Attempting this on your own can be challenging and less effective.

Focus on User Engagement Metrics

Ensure that deeper engagement metrics are employed, such as time spent on a page, scroll depth, and interaction rates, to provide a clearer picture of ad effectiveness. Analyzing post-click behavior helps determine the quality of engagements, ensuring that clicks result in meaningful interactions.

By partnering with well-established digital marketing companies, SMBs can access advanced technologies and strategies to ensure that digital marketing efforts are practical and efficient. Make sure your website conversions are as high as possible. YouTube and Google Search are leading the way in combating bot traffic, while LinkedIn, Google Video Partners, and X are less effective at blocking “bad bots.” Finding a reliable digital partner is crucial to protecting your ad spend and maximizing your returns. Beware of the bad bot and ensure your advertising efforts drive genuine value.

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