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Jason Whitlock, Kayce Smith Address Social Media Spat On Barstool Radio Show

Brandon Contes

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It’s rare to see people of different backgrounds, from different media companies together on one show. But Tuesday afternoon, Outkick’s Jason Whitlock joined Kayce Smith on her SiriusXM Barstool Radio Show to discuss their recent social media debate. 

Last week, Whitlock wrote a column claiming privilege for attractive women looking for jobs in sports. In the column, Whitlock cited Maria Taylor, Erin Andrews and Katie Nolan as female sports journalists who were helped in receiving jobs by their physical appearance. 

Barstool’s Kayce Smith acknowledged looks can play a role in determining opportunities and success for men and women in the sports media industry, but her issue stemmed from the idea that it can be the only factor. 

The conversation moved toward Whitlock sharing an Instagram photo of Smith in a dress while she was vacationing in Los Angeles. It should be noted, the photo was first shared with Whitlock by one of his Twitter followers, he didn’t appear to have been scouring Smith’s Instagram account for point-making pictures.

https://twitter.com/WhitlockJason/status/1309593813032284160

Whitlock claimed sharing the photo was a form of comedy, an opinion Smith and her co-host Kevin Clancy pushed back on. The odd part about the interview was they essentially agreed looks can enhance a person’s sports media success, but debated the idea of Whitlock sharing Smith’s dress photo being “just a joke.” 

The bigger takeaway from this interview should be the willingness of Whitlock and Smith to have an actual conversation following a social media dispute. When two journalists or entertainers from different companies argue on social media, it’s not uncommon for one person to invite the other and their show or platform. But rarely does the invitee accept the offer. They may not have agreed or settled the situation, but credit Whitlock for joining Smith on her Barstool Radio show.

I wrote this earlier in the week after the Twitter quarrel between Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and Outkick founder Clay Travis. Travis invited Cuban onto his radio show to continue the discussion, knowing the offer would likely be declined. But I have no doubt the offer was genuine. Whitlock actually went ahead and joined someone else’s brand to address a disagreement, a rarity in media.

Sports Radio News

The Michael Kay Show Ponders Why Broadcasters Don’t Share Their Salaries Like Players

“Because if we were baseball players, we’d all know what we make and we could all go to management and negotiate based off that information. I can’t do that.”

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The salaries of virtually every professional athlete can be found through one avenue or another. And, apparently, if two thirds of The Michael Kay Show had their way, that information would be accessible for broadcasters as well.

While discussing how much MLB players earn for winning the World Series, the topic devolved into how much Kay makes each year.

After telling Don La Greca and Peter Rosenberg players make $516,347 for winning the World Series, the pair hounded Kay about his salary.

“That’s what? Three months salary for you?,” La Greca asked.

“I don’t understand you guys,” Kay said. “You’re very…”

“Very curious about how much you make? Yes,” La Greca interrupted.

“Why are you so curious?,” countered Kay.

“Because if we were baseball players, we’d all know what we make and we could all go to management and negotiate based off that information,” said La Greca. “I can’t do that. What’s different? We’re personalities, we do things publicly, we’re in competition with other radio stations. I don’t understand why you can’t just — right now — tell me how much you’re making. Gerrit Cole can do it. Shohei Ohtani can do it.”

“If Michael would do it, you’d do it right now,” Rosenberg chipped in.

“Without question,” La Greca said.

“Here’s the deal: The great Scott Boras once told me — about representing broadcasters — ‘You guys are your own worst enemy’,” Kay said. “I asked why and he said ‘Because you don’t have a database of what you all make. So, the people that are negotiating with you, they have all the information. They know who makes what. You guys have no idea. Michael, you have no idea what Gary Cohen makes. Gary Cohen has no idea what you make.'”

“Someone needs to stand out, show the cubes — as you like to say — and throw it out there,” concluded La Greca. “Then everybody else will look gutless if they don’t.”

Rosenberg said the downside of sharing their salary on the air is that no matter what the number would be, noting he would be the lowest of the three, listeners “would be sickened” by the number, adding “they don’t think our job is a job, and they’d do it for free”.

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Sports Radio News

Colin Cowherd Believes ‘Poorly Run’ New York Teams Make Decisions From Media Reactions

“When I used to live out east in Connecticut, you’d hear WFAN, and you’d hear them Met fans complaining, and then they’d go out and make a signing in free agency because their fans were complaining.”

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Many in sports radio believe they could be fantastic front office personnel for the teams they regularly discuss. FOX Sports Radio host Colin Cowherd believes there are front office personnel in New York who take their cues from sports radio hosts and newspaper columnists.

“I think it’s fair to say in the big cities — especially northeast cities, with larger, louder media, Philly, Boston, New York — GM’s, and owners listen to talk radio,” Cowherd said. “They read the columns. The northeast media has more influence than the west coast media.”

Cowherd then pointed to a specific team and specific station for his criticism.

“When I used to live out east in Connecticut, you’d hear WFAN, and you’d hear them Met fans complaining, and then they’d go out and make a signing in free agency because their fans were complaining.”

He then used the example of the Mets signing Jason Bay in 2009 after fans clamored for the team to sign the outfielder. He struggled during his tenure and was released after three seasons.

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Sports Radio News

The Ken Carman Show: NFL Begging For More Flex Schedule in Late Season Games For Higher Ratings

“They’ve never done what they just did: Move a game and have 55,000 people attend the game.”

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The Cleveland Browns recently had their game against the Bills moved to Detroit due to more than 70 inches of snow falling in Buffalo. 92.3 The Fan in Cleveland hosts Ken Carman and Anthony Lima discussed whether that game being moved and allowing fans to attend with discounted tickets was a test balloon for future NFL scheduling changes.

“I am worried that the NFL is basically gonna have an open slate in terms of a schedule for the last four weeks of the season,” Lima said. “I’m worried the league will say “We’re worried making sure these games meet this threshold of if the game is a big game and a lot of eyeballs are on it’.

“And because they just demonstrated that they can not only move the time of a game, but they’ve moved the dates of games because of COVID. They’ve never done what they just did: Move a game and have 55,000 people attend the game. What that makes me nervous about is it gives the NFL the thought of ‘How can we maximize our television ratings late in the year and make sure we don’t have dog games in the late stages and bring the most value to our partners.'”

Lima then said he envisioned a scenario where the station had events planned in Cincinnati before a Sunday game at 1:00 PM but at the last minute was told the game had been moved to Monday Night Football. Carman asked if two weeks was enough time to prepare in advance.

“I’m just telling you, I can see this coming for the NFL,” Lima concluded.

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