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LinkedIn’s Entry Into Stories Makes $ense

“There’s a lot of ‘look at me’ content on LinkedIn., not a lot of ‘learn from me.’

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LinkedIn Stories launched last Friday and managed to divide this country even further. You’re either in one of two camps: You either hate LinkedIn Stories or you love them.

There is no in between.

Much like Facebook & Instagram, LinkedIn Stories lets users post updates that only live on the site for only 24 hours, then disappear. After it launched last Friday, tweet after tweet asked: But, why? Why do we need Stories on LinkedIn? Here’s why.

In a blog post, LinkedIn said: “Stories are a great way to start lightweight conversations related to work-life. Based on what we’ve heard from our members during our testing across the globe, the stories that resonate well are professional in nature, and make it easy for a response – for example, you could share a unique perspective from your work day, ask a question to your network, share insights on timely breaking news, walk through a product demo or teach others a new skill.”

People may be envisioning ‘what I ate for breakfast’ Instagram-like Stories have arrived on LinkedIn. But, there’s actually a lot to learn from Instagram Stories, if you follow the right accounts and that type of same messaging can be applied to LinkedIn Stories.

My guess is that some (not all) of the people tweet-complaining about LinkedIn Stories have never executed a Story on any social media platform and/or simply don’t know how to use it, technically or creatively. And, because they haven’t executed one, they have yet to discover the value in it.

And, there is value in it, if you provide value.

THERE IS R-O-I IN Y-O-U

LinkedIn Stories offers you a chance to take a deeper dive into who you are, what you do and how you do it. There’s a lot of people out there saying the exact same thing. It’s who you are and how you deliver it that attracts your audience.

It’s not about the message. It’s about the messenger.

ADDING STORIES TO LINKEDIN MAKES SENSE (AND CENTS)

In January 2019, there were 500 million daily active Stories users worldwide, up from 400 million just six months prior to that. It’s growing. And, it’s growing fast. (via Statista)

One of the reasons LinkedIn started exploring the Stories option is because they found that more people felt freer to share things that aren’t permanently in their timeline.

That’s because we’ve created personas for each of our social media accounts. And, they’re all different. Who we are on Facebook is not who we are on LinkedIn, who we are on Instagram is not who we are on Twitter. We’ve put ourselves in a box, which was the basis of a hilarious viral trend from January of this year that was started by no other than Dolly Parton herself.

That was in January. Then, in March—COVID-19 barged in and our lives were turned upside down and those box lines blurred.

With more people working from home, the lines between work life and personal life have blurred. When Lauren Griffiths, a mom of three, looked at her LinkedIn profile picture, the person looking back at her did not reflect her or the time we’re living in now.

She wrote: “Recently, I took a hard look at my LinkedIn profile photo – the woman staring back at me had newly highlighted hair and a fresh cut, a pressed blazer, a hint of a smile that showed just the right amount of teeth to let you know she was serious, but could be lighthearted when needed.  I remember standing in my power pose as my husband snapped the photos. We poured through about 80 shots before we found the one that looked perfectly polished. But the person I was exuding then is not always who I am, and certainly not who I am right now.”

With currently more than 777,000 likes and more than 26,000 comments, it struck a chord with LinkedIn users and attracted the attention of “Good Morning America,” as well.

Griffiths ended her post by saying, “I’ve witnessed and read enough on authentic leadership to know that being genuine and vulnerable will get you a lot farther in your career than a glossy headshot.”

And, therein lies the opportunity in Stories that people aren’t seeing. Stories = Authenticity.

I’ll be honest, if I had never gotten brave in Stories, I would have never ventured into TikTok, where I’ve grown a following of 75,000 and 1.5 million likes. And, I would have never jumped on Instagram Reels, Instagram’s TikTok carbon copy, when it was released this past August. Why it matters—reasons like this: An Instagram Reel I posted on a Saturday resulted in me being on the phone with a New York Times best-selling author by Monday.

Every post matters.

LinkedIn Stories is a place to build a personalized connection with your audience, a chance to emerge from the business persona, to take down the professional wall, to show the behind-the-scenes of your day-to-day. What a normal, ordinary day is to you might be a peek behind Oz’s curtain to someone else. It’s an opportunity to provide quick tips, tricks and teachable moments from your day.

A chance for you to position yourself as the expert.

There’s two different types of content:

  • LOOK AT ME
  • LEARN FROM ME

And, let’s face it: There’s a lot of ‘look at me’ content on LinkedIn.

There’s not a lot of ‘learn from me.’

People buy from people. It’s just that simple.

I spent 20 years in television and when I got out of that bubble, I never understood this B2B, B2C speak in the outside world.

It’s human to human.

“Authenticity is a collection of choices that we have to make every day. It’s about the choice to show up and be real.”

-Brene Brown

Those that see the opportunity in it will win.

BNM Writers

Viewers Turn To Fox News For 9/11 Memorial Ceremonies

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Memorial
Fox News

Ceremonies commemorating the 20th anniversary of 9/11 at the memorial sites of the World Trade Center area in New York, the Pentagon in Washington D.C. and Shanksville, Pennsylvania were covered by multiple networks.

On the cable front, Fox News Channel led all in coverage, well above their cable news competition. As the following is noted, FNC was ahead in each hour according to key figures tabulated by Nielsen Media Research:

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

FNC: 1.258 million total viewers; 179,000 adults 25-54

CNN: 0.369 million total viewers

MSNBC. 0.314 million total viewers; 48,000 adults 25-54

8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

FNC: 1.891 million total viewers; 339,000 adults 25-54

CNN: 0.479 million total viewers

MSNBC. 0.524 million total viewers; 58,000 adults 25-54

9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

FNC: 1.771 million total viewers; 306,000 adults 25-54

CNN: 0.616 million total viewers

MSNBC. 0.640 million total viewers; 59,000 adults 25-54

10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

FNC: 1.770 million total viewers; 285,000 adults 25-54

CNN: 0.704 million total viewers

MSNBC. 0.733 million total viewers; 77,000 adults 25-54

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

FNC: 1.411 million total viewers; 198,000 adults 25-54

CNN: N/A

MSNBC. 0.862 million total viewers; 78,000 adults 25-54

12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

FNC: 1.242 million total viewers; 230,000 adults 25-54

CNN: N/A

MSNBC. 0.813 million total viewers; 74,000 adults 25-54

History Channel aired 9/11 programming throughout the day, highlighted by the premiere of two new two-hour specials; “Four Flights” (1.166 million viewers; 370,000 adults 25-54) and “I Was There” (1.054 million viewers; 400,000 adults 25-54) — both were cable’s top non-sports telecasts of Saturday, Sep. 11, based on 25-54.

Within a four-week span, HBO aired Spike Lee’s eight-hour documentary “NYC Epicenters 9/11 —> 2021½“, with the conclusion on Saturday, Sep. 11. Its original airings’ figures were, as follows:

Part 1 — Sun. Aug. 22: 212,000 viewers; 90,000 adults 25-54

Part 2 — Sun. Aug. 29: 163,000 viewers; 73,000 adults 25-54

Part 3 — Sun. Sep. 5: 200,000 viewers; 77,000 adults 25-54

Part 4 — Sat. Sep. 11: 237,000 viewers; 120,000 adults 25-54

Note: The above data does not reflect the cumulative viewership of the episodes’ re-airings on the various HBO network and streaming platforms.

Over on the broadcast networks, NBC’s special telecast of “Saturday TODAY” (with Savannah GuthrieHoda Kotb and Lester Holt) easily bested ABC’s “Good Morning America Saturday” in both total viewers — 1.71 million vs. 1.24 million — and in the key 25-54 demo, with NBC nearly doubling ABC: 438,000, to 243,000. (Data for CBS and the Fox broadcast network were unavailable.)

Here are the cable news averages for September 6-12, 2021.

Total Day (September 6-12 @ 6 a.m.-5:59 a.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 1.378 million viewers; 226,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 0.650 million viewers; 78,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.532 million viewers; 1177,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.200 million viewers; 65,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.131 million viewers; 32,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.129 million viewers; 18,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.127 million viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.076 million viewers; 9,000 adults 25-54

Prime Time (September 6-11 @ 8-11 p.m.; September 12 @ 7-11 p.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 2.268 million viewers; 359,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 1.101 million viewers; 138,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.715 million viewers; 169,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.223 million viewers; 66,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.188 million viewers; 61,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.156 million viewers; 29,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.152 million viewers; 27,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.044 million viewers; 7,000 adults 25-54

Top 10 most-watched cable news programs (and the top MSNBC and CNN programs with their respective associated ranks) in total viewers:

1. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 5:28 PM, 32 min.) 3.688 million viewers

2. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.139 million viewers

3. Hannity (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.085 million viewers

4. Hannity (FOXNC, Wed. 9/8/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.073 million viewers

5. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.013 million viewers

6. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.003 million viewers

7. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 9/8/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.971 million viewers

8. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 9/8/2021 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.962 million viewers

9. Hannity (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.958 million viewers

10. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 9/10/2021 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.938 million viewers

17. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Tue. 9/7/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.323 million viewers

139. The Lead With Jake Tapper (CNN, Thu. 9/9/2021 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.991 million viewers

Top 10 cable news programs (and the top  MSNBC, CNN and HLN programs with their respective associated ranks) among adults 25-54:

1. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 5:28 PM, 32 min.) 0.535 million adults 25-54

2. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.528 million adults 25-54

3. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.523 million adults 25-54

4. Hannity (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.503 million adults 25-54

5. The Ingraham Angle (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 10:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.483 million adults 25-54

6. The Ingraham Angle (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 10:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.480 million adults 25-54

7. Hannity (FOXNC, Thu. 9/9/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.474 million adults 25-54

8. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 9/8/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.471 million adults 25-54

9. Hannity (FOXNC, Wed. 9/8/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.468 million adults 25-54

10. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 9/7/2021 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.442 million adults 25-54

27. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Thu. 9/9/2021 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.316 million adults 25-54

63. Anderson Cooper 360 (CNN, Wed. 9/8/2021 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.249 million adults 25-54

167. Forensic Files “Chief Evidence” (HLN, Wed. 9/8/2021 12:30 AM, 30 min.) 0.149 million adults 25-54

Source: Live+Same Day data, Nielsen Media Research

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BNM Writers

How News Talkers Can Beat Sports Talkers at Their Own Game

Despite the fact that News and Sports Talk are considered different formats to many, oftentimes they intertwine more than the casual observer would believe.

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Despite the fact that News Talk and Sports Talk are considered different formats to many, oftentimes, they intertwine more than the casual observer would believe. First off, both formats are under the “talk” umbrella, and there are many News Talk listeners who consume Sports Talk, and there is some, albeit less, of that vice versa. 

However, while News Talk can dabble into the sports realm ahead of a big game or a cultural issue, usually, the Sports Talk station/hosts will still be considered the “experts” on the topic. 

But what if there’s a situation where that isn’t the case? What if the News Talkers can beat the Sports Talkers at their own game?

That’s possible and doable. 

This can happen when the issue of sports and business overlap. For example, in Kansas City, a hot topic this week has been the possibility of the Kansas City Royals looking to move to a downtown ballpark and leaving Kauffman Stadium when the lease runs out in 2031 (or perhaps earlier). While it’s likely ten years away, anyone who has followed these types of situations knows the planning needs to begin years in advance. 

That always brings up the next batch of questions: Where will they go? Would they threaten to leave the city? And most importantly, who is paying for it? 

While the Sports Talkers will undoubtedly have some insider information into what the team is thinking, News Talkers might have even more valuable insight to share with the audience that the Sports Talkers can’t access. 

Why? Because we are more likely to be very familiar and have strong relationships with the politicians, bureaucrats, local commissioners, and business power players, who play just as much of a role, if not a bigger one, in a monumental move and decision like this.

Within 12 hours of the Kansas City Royals owner holding a press conference discussing this potential move, I was confident, after talking with politicians/business people in the know, I could bring my audience inside information in a way no sports talker could. 

Beyond just what is convenient for a team’s ownership group, there are plays for land, parking lots, zoning requirements, permits, and yes, dirty politics, that all get involved in these types of moves.

That’s our lane in the News Talk business. We deal with these issues on a daily basis, and we know who exactly to contact, depending on the situation. 

So whether it’s the Oakland Raiders leaving for Las Vegas, the St. Louis Rams bailing for Los Angeles, or the Seattle SuperSonics heading to Oklahoma City, these are just a handful of examples of where the News Talkers can beat the Sports Talkers at their own game in a story that has mass appeal to both audiences.

And the beauty of all this is you don’t even need to be a “sports expert” to own this story if and when it comes to your town (or rumors start to swirl). You need to simply work the connections you already have, which are highly unlikely to be had by your sports counterparts, do some digging and cross-referencing, and you can own a story like this in your city in no time. You might even be able to draw new cume to your show and station by being the authoritative figure on the topic. 

And then, when it all inevitably comes back around to breaking down pitching changes and hit-and-runs, leave that to the jocks. That’s boring stuff anyway. 

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BNM Writers

It’s Not a Vaccine Mandate, It’s a Test Mandate

“Chuck Todd from Meet The Press, the New York Times, CNN, numerous other media outlets and even the White House spokesman have called Biden’s policy a vaccine mandate. It’s not. So, why do they keep reporting it as such?”

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I feel I must disclose my feelings on Covid-19 before my column this week so everyone knows my bias. 

If you want to take the horse dewormer medicine, Ivermectin, for Covid-19, I DON’T CARE.

If you want to wear a mask in a crowd indoors or out, I DON’T CARE

If you don’t want to get a Covid-19 vaccine, again, I DON’T CARE. 

In terms of full disclosure, I have been vaccinated. As far as I know, I haven’t had Covid-19, and only my dog has had some form of Ivermectin. 

With that out of the way, can we talk about how President Biden’s mandate is being discussed and reported on? This is not a liberal or conservative issue, and it’s not a CNN vs FOX News issue. Most everyone has an opinion on it, yet most don’t care to find out what was actually proposed. Even the White House is misleading folks with its own policy. 

This is not a vaccine mandate, it’s a test mandate. 

President Biden’s policy has made two changes. All federal workers must receive a vaccine. You don’t have to work for the federal government, but if you do, you must be vaccinated. Again, not a mandate. No one is forcing you to work for the federal government. That’s your choice.  

Delta Airlines implemented a policy charging employees $200 if they choose not to be vaccinated. As a result, thousands have received the Covid-19 vaccine to avoid the penalty. That is their choice. 

Schools, public and private universities, hospitals, and companies big and small have made similar rules. If you want to work or attend, you must get a vaccine. Not a vaccine mandate, big difference.

Companies make all sorts of rules, some smart, some dumb. I know a radio station that will not let their on-air hosts talk to the media (dumb). My company policy says, I can’t eat food in the studio (smart). You can agree or disagree with a policy, and if you choose not to follow it, that is your choice. Nobody from the government is going to come to your home, hold you down, and jab a needle in your arm. Yet I’ve heard that said a few hundred times in the last few weeks.

Part two of President Biden’s policy says that if you are a company with over 100 employees, your employees will be required to have a vaccine or get tested weekly to see if they are Covid-19 positive. Again, this is not a vaccine mandate. It’s just a test, once a week. A test mandate, if you will.

Chuck Todd from Meet The Press, the New York Times, CNN, numerous other media outlets and even the White House spokesman have called Biden’s policy a vaccine mandate. It’s not. So, why do they keep reporting it as such?   

I talk to neighbors, callers, and friends, and they’re all arguing over something that isn’t happening. Some have gotten really angry and stood defiant. They will not, under any circumstances, be forced to get a vaccine. 

“How about a test?” 

“Wait, what?”  

These are crazy times. We talk past each other, we debate our own set of facts, we get to choose the news we like, and disregard and disqualify the news we don’t. I’m afraid we have crossed some type of rubicon. Everyone is arguing and debating a policy but nobody knows the actual policy.

If you think taking a test to find out if you have a life threatening virus that could harm you, a family member, or a coworker is government overreach, I DON’T CARE. Quite frankly, I’m exhausted by the screaming. But if you are going to argue about it, you should do yourself a favor and know what the policy is before you decide you are for it or against it. 

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