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Megyn Kelly Leaving New York City After Letter Sent Around Her Kids School Targets White Kids

Kelly made the announcement on her podcast this week. “The schools have always been far-left, which doesn’t align with my own ideology, but I didn’t really care, most of my friends are liberals, it’s fine.”

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Conservative pundit Megyn Kelly said that she is removing her children from their prestigious New York private school and leaving the city after she discovered a letter circulating the school comparing white kids to “killer cops.”

Kelly made the announcement on her podcast this week. “The schools have always been far-left, which doesn’t align with my own ideology, but I didn’t really care, most of my friends are liberals, it’s fine. I come from a Democrat family, I’m not offended at all by the ideology, and I lean center-left on some things.”

Kelly read parts of the letter written by Nahliah Webber, executive director of the nonprofit Orleans Public Education Network, and posted on a blog titled “If You Really Want to Make a Difference in Black Lives, Change How You Teach White Kids.”

The letter went on to say that there is a “killer cop sitting in every school where white children learn.” The letter continued, “I am tired of white people reveling in their state-sanctioned depravity, snuffing out black life with no consequences.”

Kelly has two sons Thatcher and Edward and daughter Yardley. Kelly, who said she is also pulling her daughter out of her school, slammed Webber’s opinions.

“Which boy in my kid’s school is the future killer cop? Is it my boy? Which boy is it?” Kelly said. “Because I don’t happen to believe that they’re in there.”

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Emmis Going Private After Shareholder Approval

The transition will not be a fast one, as the company will reacquire its stock at growing prices over a three-year period.

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Emmis Corporation, previously known as Emmis Communications, will go private after a shareholder meeting today.

Shareholders voted overwhelmingly to approve changing the company’s articles of incorporation.

The transition will not be a fast one, as the company will reacquire its stock at growing prices over a three-year period. Shares will be redeemed at price points growing from $6 per share in 2023, $6.50 in 2024, and $7.25 in 2025.

Company founder Jeff Smulyan owns all of the group’s Class B common stock. He has also agreed to not block the liquidation of his stock if all of the Class A stock hasn’t been acquired by August 2026.

“I am grateful to the Emmis shareholders for their tremendous support of our proposal to amend our articles of incorporation, which will give us the opportunity to return significant capital, invest in our current businesses, and seek new ventures,” Smulyan said in a statement.

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NPR Uniting News and Programming Divisions Under New Chief Content Officer

“This new unified division will include more than 600 people working together to support all aspects of content production for NPR.”

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With the announcement that NPR executive Anya Grundmann is exiting, the network has announced a plan to unify its content under one division starting next month.

President and CEO John Lansing told employees the network’s News and Programming divisions will be combined into one single unit beginning on Monday, September 11th.

“This new unified division will include more than 600 people working together to support all aspects of content production for NPR,” Lansing said.

After the departure of Grundmann, the division will be run on an interim basis by Edith Chapin, who has been appointed as the newly created Chief Content Officer.

Previously, NPR’s news and other content offerings were separated and overseen by different executives. During her time at the public broadcaster, Grundmann oversaw the podcast, music, events, video, and talk radio programming.

Under the new structure, nine executives will report to the CCO.

“This new structure will ensure we’re more united than ever in our efforts to strengthen our network and succeed in our mission to reach our current and future audiences wherever they consume NPR content,” Lansing concluded.

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Tax Credit Considered For Small Businesses Advertising With Local Stations

The bill would offer a payroll tax credit to news organizations of $25,000 per employee for the first year and $15,000 for each year following to retain or hire local news reporters.

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A new bill presented to Congress would give small businesses a tax credit for placing advertising with local newspapers, television, and radio stations.

The Community News and Small Business Support Act was introduced by Reps. Suzan DelBene (D-WA) and Claudia Tenney (R-NY) as a way to bring federal support to smaller news outlets.

The proposed bill would create $5,000 in tax credit for the first year and $2,500 in subsequent years for grocery stores, restaurants, and other small businesses that advertise with local news sources. The businesses must have fewer than 50 employees, and the tax credit would account for 80% of their advertising spending in the first year with radio and television stations.

Additionally, the bill would offer a payroll tax credit to news organizations of $25,000 per employee for the first year and $15,000 for each year following to retain or hire local news reporters. Local journalists would be required to dedicate 800 hours per year to local newsrooms.

The bill has received bipartisan support. In addition to being co-presented by a Republican and Democrat, the bill was co-sponsored by Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) and Andrew Carson (D-IN).

The tax credit was estimated to cost $1.67 billion over five years before the program expired.

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