Connect with us
Jim Cutler Demos

Media Business

LA Times Editor Steps Down

Like many media outlets, The Times felt the financial blow as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The newspaper suffered losses from ad buys as the pandemic and shutdowns impacted more businesses during the second quarter of 2020.

Eduardo Razo

Published

on

The Los Angeles Times will be undergoing a significant change to its staff as editor Norman Pearlstine will step down from his position after two and a half years. The 78-year-old will assume an advisory role for the paper as they look to appoint a new overseer of the newsroom.

The Times’s owner and Executive Chairman Patrick Soon-Shiong sent a letter to the staff announcing Pearlstine’s decision to step down. Pearlstine mentioned that he’d be retiring in October, but there was no timetable for his exit.

Furthermore, The Times will appoint two veteran interim managers to take over Pearlstine’s role as an independent hiring firm manages to find a new executive editor.

“As we became the new owners and needed to rapidly and thoughtfully revive this great American newspaper, Norm’s experience as a journalist and media executive proved invaluable,” Soon-Shiong said.

Like many media outlets, The Times felt the financial blow as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The newspaper suffered losses from ad buys as the pandemic and shutdowns impacted more businesses during the second quarter of 2020.

Nonetheless, Soon-Shiong thanked Pearlstine for helping guide the media outlet through this challenging time. “We’re fortunate that we have a strong leadership team in place, both in the newsroom and across the company. We will continue the search to find the right candidate to serve as the next editor of the Los Angeles Times and provide an update when we have more news to share,” the Times’s owner said.

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Media Business

Meta Uses AI to Get Around Apple’s Privacy Regulations

In August, Meta launched Advantage+, a tool that uses artificial intelligence to automatically generate multiple advertisements…

Published

on

wikimedia.com

Meta has been pursuing efforts to adapt its advertising strategy using AI and machine learning technology. This is in response to Apple’s privacy policy which does not allow companies to harvest user data without their permission. Meta has said it lost around $10bn in revenue in the nine months after Apple rolled out its privacy changes in April 2021.

“Driven by powerful machine learning, Advantage+ app campaigns deliver the highest performing creative to the most relevant audience on the most effective placements,” the Facebook Help Center states.

Meta has been investing heavily in applying machine learning and artificial intelligence to navigate advertising challenges. This is to overcome the restrictions introduced by Apple two years ago that force apps to get permission to track users and serve them personalized ads, according to The Financial Times. 

Before Apple’s new policy, Meta allowed advertisers to target users on the Facebook and Instagram apps based on their behavior and data collected from users’ online activities outside the platform. Meta also tracked people’s demographic characteristics such as age and gender to improve ad accuracy. 

In August, Meta launched Advantage+, a tool that uses artificial intelligence to automatically generate multiple advertisements according to the specific objectives of the marketer. For example, if the goal is to make a sale or gain a new follower. 

Advantage+ runs tests of potential ads and selects what they deem most effective, with the option to automatically alter text and images. 

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Continue Reading

Media Business

Hubbard, NAB Study: First Party Data Increases Listening

“There are opportunities for us to engage with our registered streaming audience by segmenting them and executing strategies focused on their past listening behaviors.”

Published

on

pexels.com

The NAB Pilot Accelerator study conducted by Hubbard Radio, in partnership with the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), shows how radio stations can leverage first-party data of listeners to increase listening and time spent. 

This means analyzing the available personal data of listeners, like email addresses used to sign up for subscriptions. Hubbard has a long history of collecting key user info via its websites, live players, and mobile apps. The company holds eight years’ worth of listening sessions history and time spent associated with individual user accounts, all of which have an email address tied to them, according to Inside Radio.

“There are opportunities for us to engage with our registered streaming audience by segmenting them and executing strategies focused on their past listening behaviors,” Hubbard said in NAB’s First-Party Data Direct-to-Consumer Accelerator report.

Hubbard concluded that its first-party database helps the company identify who is listening, and listening patterns overall. “We have a huge opportunity to nurture relationships with those listeners to keep them engaged with our stations,” Hubbard says.

Although access to personal data may open doors for broadcasters, this type of data collection remains a controversial issue among Americans. In a study released in 2022 by the Pew Research Center, 72% of Americans reported feeling that all, almost all, or most of what they do online or while using their cellphone is being tracked by advertisers, technology firms, or other companies.

The NAB Pilot Accelerator study was reportedly initiated to address the phasing out of third-party cookies by the digital advertising industry. 

Broadcast radio and the TV industry is projected to lose $2.1 billion in digital ad revenue annually – or 6.3% of total ad revenue – with the elimination of cookies, according to a Borrell Associates study commissioned by PILOT and presented at NAB Show New York last fall.

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Continue Reading

Media Business

FEMA Says AM Radio is Vital to U.S Safety

“When all else fails, radio stations are often the last line of communications that communities have.”

Published

on

pexels.com

Seven former FEMA officials have sent a letter to U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, asking the federal government to help keep AM radios in electric vehicles. The group is petitioning the government to seek assurances from automakers to maintain AM radios in EVs, arguing that AM radio transmitters are vital to the federal National Public Warning System.

“When all else fails, radio stations are often the last line of communications that communities have,” former FEMA head Craig Fugate, a signer of the letter, told The Wall Street Journal.

Ford and Tesla have removed AM radios in newer electric models. The automakers reasoning behind removing AM radio is that electric vehicles generate electromagnetic frequencies on the same wavelength as AM radio signals and this causes a buzzing sound interference.

The letter to government officials addresses the severity of removing this communication mechanism from EVs, “Should this continue, it will represent a grave threat to future local, state, and federal disaster response and relief efforts.”

According to FEMA, more than 75 radio stations, most of which are AM signals and cover 90% of the U.S. population, have backup equipment that allows them to stay on the air during and after an emergency.

“Federal law mandates that FEMA always maintain its ability to deliver messages to the American people en masse. The National Public Warning System, the only method the government has to reach every point of the country at once, allows it to do so,” the letter continues.

Antwane Johnson, the director of FEMA’s emergency-warning system, said that removing AM radio in EVs could affect the ability of people to receive critical public safety information while in their vehicles.

“AM radio has been tested over and over during the most devastating natural disasters—and has withstood them all,” Johnson told WSJ.

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Advertisement

Upcoming Events

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2024 Barrett Media.