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Podcast Review: Skimm This

On the latest edition of Skimm This hosted by Justine Davie, thousands of National Guard troops are in Washington D.C. this week as the world prepares for a transition of power. Jytte Klausen, professor of politics, Brandeis University, discusses the security breaches that led to the riots at the Capitol building.

Ryan Hedrick

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The attack on the U.S. Capitol during a rally hosted by President Trump raises questions about the safety of the upcoming inauguration. The security breaches experienced on that day brought some disturbing realizations to the surface leading to the resignations of the head of the U.S. Capitol Police and two other senior security officials.

On the latest edition of Skimm This hosted by Justine Davie, thousands of National Guard troops are in Washington D.C. this week as the world prepares for a transition of power. Jytte Klausen, professor of politics, Brandeis University, discusses the security breaches that led to the riots at the Capitol building.

Klaussen saidthat ever since several members of a Michigan militia were arrested after plotting to kidnap the state’s governor last year, she has anticipated more political violence. “The minute I was watching the footage of the storming of the Capitol building and noticed people carrying zip ties that is what I thought about.”

Another that became apparent during that fateful day was the lack of information sharing going on between the several law enforcement agencies that patrol the area around the Capitol. Reports indicate that there was plenty of intelligence that was available in the weeks leading up to the riots.  

“The lack of information sharing, the usual threat assessment mechanisms, police were not engaged, they were not meeting prior to the events,” Klaussen said. “I think we just need to say that this was a situation where all the information was there, but no upper hand picture ended up forming.”

Days after the Capitol was attacked, U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steve Sund resigned amid pressure that he could have prepared his force better in the days before the attack. Sund pushed back against that assessment saying that he requested the D.C. National Guard to be placed on standby in case his forces were overwhelmed by protestors.

“If we would have had the National Guard, we could have held them at bay longer until more officers from our partner agencies arrived,” Sund said to the Washington Post. Sund said that six calls for backup during the riots were rejected or delayed.

To prevent further violence, law enforcement officials are considering designating groups that participated in last week’s attack, domestic terrorist organizations. The challenge in taking that step is that domestic terrorism is not a federal crime, according to Brette Steele, director of prevention and national security, McCain Institute.

“Here in the United States the Secretary of State is authorized to designate an organization as a foreign terrorist organization,” Steele said. “The charges for domestic terrorism in the United States are incredibly limited. For instance, if you use certain types of mechanisms like explosives, there may be a terrorism charge.”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation said they are seeing a lot of online chatter about several events centered on the inauguration. A rehearsal of the inauguration was cancelled Sunday because of security concerns.

If the federal government is going to designated certain groups as domestic terrorist organizations ahead of the inauguration, there are some advantages and disadvantages that are particularly noteworthy.

“The advantage is that once you designate a group as a terrorist organization, then being a member of that group and providing support for that group becomes a criminal offense,” Klaussen said. “The disadvantage is that sometimes it makes it harder to identify the groups because they go underground. This type of criminalization is particularly useless.”

The U.S. Secret Service is the lead agency responsible for inauguration security. The Defense Department will deploy up to 25,000 service members in Washington.

The Transportation Security Administration is on high alert following the events at the Capitol with several airlines implementing new rules.

Skimm This podcast breaks down the most complicated stories of the week and gives you the context for why they matter. You can find the podcast by clicking this link.

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Sports Talkers Podcast: Danny Parkins, 670 The Score

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Danny Parkins opens up to Stephen Strom about why he is so passionate about defending Chicago. He also gives his best career advice and explains why a best friend is more important sometimes than an agent.

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PODCAST REVIEW: Millennial Money with Shannah Compton Game

Game spotlights rental evictions and how those evictions are impacting the economy. To discuss this issue Game talks to Shabana Baksh, Real Estate Attorney at K&L Gates LLP, and Tendayi Kapfidze, Chief Economist at LendingTree.

Ryan Hedrick

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No one could have predicted what the COVID-19 pandemic was going to do to the economy. Some of the unintended consequences from the spread of last year’s virus include millions of people getting behind in either rent or mortgage payments. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about 10 million people were behind in their rent payments at the beginning of the month.

Recently, President Joe Biden extended the federal eviction moratorium through the end of the month. The Millennial Money podcast withShannah Compton Game spotlights rental evictions and how those evictions are impacting the economy. To discuss this issue Game talks to Shabana Baksh, Real Estate Attorney at K&L Gates LLP, and Tendayi Kapfidze, Chief Economist at LendingTree.

“This temporary moratorium extends some of these vital protections to millions of renters that are at risk of eviction,” said Baksh. “They are also state and local moratoriums that remain in effect who may not qualify for assistance under the federal guidelines.”

Landlords across the country have been put in a tough situation with continuing moratoriums at the federal, state, and local levels. The typical delinquent renter owes nearly $6,000, according to a report published from Moody’s Analytics. The $900 billion relief package passed in December provided $25 billion for both landlords and renters.

“What we have seen happening since the economic crisis related to the coronavirus is that a lot of people who have been affected in terms of the industries that have been adversely affected such as travel, tourism, restaurants, and places where people have to engage directly, a lot of those people happen to be renters,” Kapfidze said,  “So obviously if you are not getting paid and not getting income it is a challenge to pay for your rent.”

To qualify for the funds, which are being disbursed by states and can be used for past and present rent, a renter must show that they suffered financial hardship due to the pandemic, have incomes below 80 percent of their median income and are at risk of becoming homeless.

“Right now, renters and owners find themselves in a significant cash crunch,” said Baksh. “We are entering into the second year of this pandemic and many renters are just accruing late fees and debt and so we are seeing a large buildup of these late payments. With that said, there are policies in place to protect renters and homeowners from being evicted and provide them with rental relief.”

Landlords still must pay mortgages on these properties that are not collecting rent. Lenders started the foreclosure process on 5,999 U.S. properties in February 2021, up 15 percent from last month but down 78 percent from a year ago. The highest foreclosure rates in Utah, Delaware, and Florida.

Lenders repossessed 1,545 U.S. properties through completed foreclosures in February 2021, up 8 percent from last month but still down 85 from last year. 

“Renters should alert their landlords of their inability to pay their rent,” said Baksh. “Have an honest and open conversation with them about your situation. Try to seek a solution, landlords may be willing to negotiate during this tough time and agree to payment arrangements.”

 The one thing that renters should know about eviction moratoriums is that they do not dissolve you of the responsibility of paying your landlord.

“The devil is in the details,” said Kapfidze. “Eviction moratorium, it means that if you are the renters you are accumulating debt, you are still under contract if you are renting, and you still have an obligation to pay your bill. “In terms of the rental relief funds there are different structures of plans, but the money is not always easy to access.”

To learn more about the Millennial Money podcast with Shannah Compton Game click here

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PODCAST REVIEW: Consider This from NPR

Consider This podcast from NPR hosted by Mary Louis Kelly, hosted a conversation with several people from the Asian American community and organizations about steps that are being taken to protect people from becoming victims of senseless violence.

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There is a movement to raise awareness about the threat of violence against Asian Americans living in the United States. Last week, a 21-year-old white man murdered six women of Asian descent and two other people at Atlanta area massage businesses. Robert Aaron Long told police that his killing spree was not motivate by race by rather by his sex addiction.

The incident has motivated discussions and rallies over the past several days. Consider This podcast from NPR hosted by Mary Louise Kelly, hosted a conversation with several people from the Asian American community and organizations about steps that are being taken to protect people from becoming victims of senseless violence.

The podcast documents several incidents that did not make national news headlines. In San Francisco, 84-year-old Vicha Ratanapakdee was out for a morning walk when out of nowhere, a man shoved him violently to the ground. He died two days later. It was not the only attack like that in the region.

A local resident who is sick and tired of seeing violence carried out against his community is getting involved.  JoJo Au launched a fundraiser to hire armed private security guards to patrol her own neighborhood, Oakland’s Chinatown. She has raised almost a hundred thousand dollars.

“Honestly, I didn’t know that it was going to spread like wildfire,” said JoJo Au. “And so many people were so concerned about it and wanted to do something, but they didn’t know what. You know, the merchants, they even say they feel safer. Some of the shoppers here, they feel safer. So, you know, I’m glad that I did this.”

Kelly said the pattern is clear – Asian American communities are being terrorized by harassment and violence. “Consider this – all those crimes you just heard about happened this year before a man in Georgia shot and killed eight people, most of whom were women of Asian descent.”

A group called Stop AAPI Hate tracks violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Since the start of the pandemic, they have received reports of nearly 4,000 hate incidents across the United States. 

Connie Chung Joe is CEO of a legal aid group, Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles.

“Almost half of them are coming from California,” Chung said. “Another thing is that women are targeted more than twice as often as men. And then we are seeing a spate of hate and violence targeted at our seniors.

Chung said the Asian American that she knows are advising their parents and grandparents to stay in the house. “Even for things like daily walks or trips to the grocery store. So, folks are really worried about this. And there’s also a lot of outrage about why this is still allowed to happen in our society?”

Ben Nguyen is a Georgia state representative. Her district covers part of Atlanta and DeKalb County. She believes that Robert Long killed the women because of hate and nothing else.

“We know that these are three businesses that are Asian-owned,” Nguyen said. “We know that most people who work there are Asian. And I think for anyone who lives in Atlanta and you hear the word massage parlor, that there is an understanding that perhaps there are other sex worker-related things that take place in these massage parlors. And it’s largely accepted.”

Federally, there is an effort to address violence against Asian American communities. One of the leaders of that effort is Congresswoman Grace Meng, Democrat from New York. She’s introduced legislation on the issue. Her district covers parts of New York City and Queens. We spoke this week before the shootings in Georgia.

“People are scared. People are literally telling their elderly parents and grandparents, “do not go out,” said Meng.  “You know, we’ll buy groceries for you. I had a mom – that night when I heard about that incident, she had seen it on the news, and she texted me. She said, that’s it; I’m not letting my kids play outside anymore.” 

The U.S. Department of Justice could choose to bring federal hate crime charges against Long if they uncover any evidence to prove Long targeted the victims specifically because of their race.

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