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Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy of an Analyst: Eddie Olczyk

“Olczyk appeals to all ages of fans, especially the younger ones, because he gears a lot of his analysis to the youth hockey players. Some may find it hokey, but in truth it’s great for hockey.”

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“For all you young hockey players” and “stop it right there”, just some of the familiar phrases uttered by NHL analyst Eddie Olczyk on his local and national broadcasts. “Edzo” as he’s affectionately known, has been the lead color commentator on NBC’s broadcast of the NHL since 2007 and he’s held the same role with the Chicago Blackhawks broadcasts since 2006. The Chicago area native has done it all in professional hockey. Olczyk played at a high level, coached in the NHL and has become one of the most successful broadcasters the sport has ever seen. 

Broadcaster Olczyk diagnosed with colon cancer

Olczyk grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and realized a dream by being selected in the first round by his hometown Blackhawks in 1984. He was the third overall pick. Olczyk scored his first NHL goal in his first game and wound up with 342 career tallies and 794 career points in 1031 games. Olczyk was traded a few times in his career but wound up finishing his run with the Blackhawks during the 1999-2000 season. He won a Stanley Cup with the Rangers in 1994.

ROAD TO NHL COLOR COMMENTARY

Following his playing career, Olczyk embarked on a career as a broadcaster. He started the journey by working on Pittsburgh Penguins television broadcasts for Fox SportsNet Pittsburgh from 2000 until 2003. Olczyk also did games for ESPN, ESPN2 and NHL Radio during his time with the Penguins. His broadcasting path was interrupted as he became the Head Coach of the Penguins from ’03 until 2005. When he was let go Olczyk took a little time off.  Eventually Olczyk came home to Chicago and began his work on Blackhawks Television in 2006, a role he continues in today. 

Also, at that time he was picked up as the lead analyst for the NHL on NBC. The network job allowed him to work a couple of Olympic Games as well. In 2010 at the Vancouver games and in 2014 at the Sochi games. In Vancouver one of his greatest lines ever was uttered when the United States defeated Canada 5-3 in a preliminary game. Ryan Kesler scored an empty net goal to sew up the win and Olczyk, a US Olympian in 1984, declared, “This has been tremendously tremendous”. The moment went viral and was an instant hit among hockey fans. 

DID YOU KNOW??

Olczyk isn’t just a hockey announcer, NBC has used him on Horse Racing coverage. He actually commentated on the “Sport of Kings” first. OIczyk took the Stanley Cup to Belmont Park in 1994 after winning it with the Rangers. He had an opportunity to take a photo with Kentucky Derby winner Go For Gin, trained by Nick Zito.

Olczyk was always into horse racing and when the NHL had a work stoppage the next season, the management of the race course he visited asked Olczyk to be their race analyst/handicapper on the in-house broadcast of the races at the track. That was actually the first time Olczyk worked on tv and is what allowed him to become a hockey analyst for NBC and also on their big race coverage including the “Derby”. 

Eddie Olczyk on the hockey, Kentucky Derby connections | NBC Sports

WHY IS HE SO GOOD?

I am fortunate to be able to watch him most nights on NBC Sports Chicago. Hawks fans expect him to be a little more of a “homer” when on the local broadcast. Olczyk delivers, but he is good not to take it to the extreme. If you’re a first-time viewer of Blackhawks hockey, you’ll know which one is his team. After all, he played for the franchise and grew up a fan of the team. It’s not over the top though.

The chemistry between Olczyk and Pat Foley on Blackhawks telecasts is remarkable. The two are a dynamite pairing. They have an ability to make their telecast seem like you’re watching two fans call a game. Not just for the fact they work for the organization, but that they are enjoying the time spent at a hockey game and it comes beaming through. Olczyk has a way of injecting humor in the right spots. He knows that during big moments in a game, you play it straight. At other times, it’s open season on laughter. It’s refreshing and you find yourself laughing right along with them.

Speaking of laughing, Olczyk has a unique way of chuckling at his own expense. Using self-deprecation if he misreads a sponsorship or misidentifies a situation. The latter rarely happens. 

Hockey acumen and Olczyk go hand in hand. I can’t tell you how many times he is able to predict things before they happen in a game. When he talks hockey, he breaks things down in a simplistic way that gains new fans to the game, without insulting the intelligence of long-time fans. That likely comes from the experience of a 16-year playing career and his time as a head coach in the league.  The passion for the NHL and the game of hockey come through in every game Olczyk does. 

Whether he’s in the booth for a national broadcast with Doc Emrick, John Forslund, Kenny Albert or a local telecast with Foley, the approach doesn’t change too much. Having fun and providing great insight are two of the things Olczyk brings to whatever broadcast he’s doing. 

Hockey is one of those sports in the United States that is still trying to find itself in the mainstream. This is where people like Olczyk are a vital cog in the wheel. He is a relatable, likable and knowledgeable ambassador for the game of hockey. Olczyk appeals to all ages of fans, especially the younger ones, because he gears a lot of his analysis to the youth hockey players. Some may find it hokey, but in truth it’s great for hockey. 

WHY HE’D BE GREAT TO WORK WITH

The ability to combine professionalism and a good time is a great trait most play-by-play announcers look for in an analyst. Olczyk is the kind of person that can not only laugh at himself, he can dish it out as well. To work alongside him would be entertaining to say the least. Olczyk has the ability to help keep an audience if a game is out of hand or one sided. 

It would not only be entertaining but informative. I truly believe people learn a lot about the game from Olczyk. I’m one to think that no matter how long an announcer has covered a sport, or feels like he/she knows the game, the former player is still the teacher. We can always learn and why not learn from those that have lived it and played it at a high level. 

Olczyk loves what he does. You can tell. You can hear it in his voice with every play he analyzes just how much he loves hockey and talking about it. That passion is evident. 

CANCER DIAGNOSIS

Not only is Edzo the cream of the crop at what he does, the man is an inspiration to others. In August of 2017, Olczyk learned he had Stage 3 colon cancer. Once the diagnosis sunk in and the treatments began, Olczyk took it public. He wanted to accomplish a few things by doing so. First, he wanted to give fellow patients hope and perseverance and second to tell people to get screened for cancer. 

“I wanted to make people aware to give them strength and hope. Sadly, people are going to get it and go through it. Hopefully, my story will help them battle every day because it’s not just a battle every treatment, it’s every second you breathe,” Olczyk told the AP in 2018. “You’re taking poison to get rid of other stuff. I was so overwhelmed by the response that I wanted to be an example for somebody going through it or somebody who will go through it, and hopefully be an olive branch.”

He was declared cancer free in March of 2018. He made a public announcement just before the start of the 2nd period of the Blackhawks and Canucks game at the United Center. 

Blackhawks honor Eddie Olczyk with 'One More Shift' on 'Hockey Fights Cancer'  night - Second City Hockey

CONCLUSION

Olczyk is the best in his field, hands down. He makes the game entertaining and will drop a little knowledge on you too. When Olczyk is on the air, it’s like watching a game with your buddy, that’s probably the highest compliment I can pay him. 

Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy Of a Broadcaster: Matt Vasgersian

“Did I mention he was a busy guy?”

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“Santa Maria!”, when you hear it, you know you’re tuned into an MLB game with Matt Vasgersian on the mic. More on the catchphrase in a moment. Vasgersian is one of those guys that you seemingly see everywhere. Why? Because he’s pretty much everywhere. Turn on MLB Network, there he is. Tune into Sunday Night Baseball on ESPN, yep, he’s there. Now, catch an Angels baseball game on TV and he’ll be there too. 

Vasgersian has been around the baseball block since the early 90’s. He spent six-seasons as a Minor League broadcaster before being hired for his first MLB gig. Vasgersian was only 29 when he became the play-by-play voice of the Milwaukee Brewers. He worked in that booth from 1997-2001. Matt then took his skills to San Diego, being named the TV voice of the Padres in 2002. He stayed in America’s Finest City until 2008, leaving for the MLB Network after the season. 

Along the way, the very busy Vasgersian held down several other positions in prominent broadcast locations. He joined Fox Sports in 2006, working NFL telecasts, MLB Game of the Week games and playoffs and some College Football BCS games.  He joined ESPN in 2018 to take over the Sunday Night Baseball lead role, while continuing his role at MLB Network. 

Did I mention he was a busy guy? 

This year he took on more of a workload and became the new play-by-play man for the Los Angeles Angels’ telecasts succeeding Victor Rojas. Vasgersian will work remotely and will do as many Angels games as his national schedule allows. 

He told the Angels media via Zoom the reasoning for taking on this job. “I kind of missed getting my skin in the game with a team,” Vasgersian said. “There’s a fine line between a national presentation of a product, when you’re doing a game for a fan base that knows more about their teams than you do, and doing a game as a team broadcaster where you are much more intimately informed as to what happened last night, and the night before and the personalities behind the game. I kind of missed that and kind of missed being involved with a team and rooting a little bit. The hope is that you appeal to the fan base as a friendly voice.”

When will this guy sleep?

BEST KNOWN FOR

Vasgersian first burst onto the national scene doing play-by-play for the original version of the XFL back in 2001. The league was new and Vince McMahon was in charge and wanted things done a certain way. Vasgersian’s time with the league was tenuous; during the first broadcast he said, “I feel uncomfortable” after a suggestive shot of the cheerleaders. McMahon didn’t like that very much and immediately demoted Vasgersian from the top telecast. NBC wanted Vasgersian back on the first team broadcast and he returned about halfway through the season.

Matt Vasgersian - XFL Play-by-Play Announcer

He made a good impression on the higher ups at NBC which ultimately led to five Olympic assignments. Vasgersian called baseball and softball from the 2004 Summer Games in Athens, ski jumping from the 2006 and 2010 Winter Games and freestyle skiing from the 2014 games in Sochi, Russia. 

Now, about that catchphrase, “Santa Maria!”. It’s not a copy, it’s an original. Oh, and it has nothing to do with one of the ships that sailed to find America in 1492. Vasgersian explained the origin to MLB.com in 2018. 

“Man, I wish there was a better story to this. [Laughing]. My family — and my sister, in particular, has one of her oldest friends — [from an] Italian family. My sister’s friend’s mother is a wonderfully animated Italian woman, who says “Santa Maria!” at a drop of a hat. For example, she goes to the grocery store and sees tomatoes are on sale. She will say, “Santa Maria, what a deal!” he explained. “I spent enough time around this wonderful lady for her to rub off on me a little bit. And I started saying “Santa Maria!” when there would be some kind of superlative moment on a baseball field. When I was in the Minors, you never want to sound gimmicky, but I try to keep it in my pocket for the right time. It’s kind of a sanctioned way of saying “Holy Blank.”

So, there you go, the explanation right from Vasgersian himself. 

WHY IS HE SO GOOD?

Vasgersian has a way about him. Not too many broadcasters are able to showcase immense talent in describing action and adding personality, wit and a sense of humor in with it. He can do it. The style isn’t for everyone, but to me in watching a baseball game, I want to be entertained, I want to laugh a little too. All of this of course shouldn’t interfere with the game itself and for Vasgersian he makes that a priority. 

He’s been known to get excitable on a broadcast, but not to the point where it’s out of bounds in a broadcast sense. Big plays happen and Vasgersian’s voice goes to a different level. He’s excited and you can sense it pretty easily. There’s a “smile” in his vocal range during a big moment, key homer, or great defensive play. In some announcers it seems forced, that’s not the case with Vasgersian at all. 

ESPN prepared to carry load of MLB wild-card matchups in new playoff format  | Newsday

Vasgersian clearly enjoys what he does for a living. It’s pretty obvious by the way he comes across in each broadcast. You could forgive a guy with as busy a schedule as his to sometimes sound less than interested, but that isn’t the case for Vasgersian. The more games, the merrier to him. 

Along those lines, it can’t be easy to prep for so many games in a week. He does have the advantage of being very dialed into the baseball scene with his work on MLB Network. But still, its impressive the amount of information he’s able to work into a game without a ton of time to prepare. 

It seems that everyone he works with enjoys being on a broadcast with him. Vasgersian keeps an analyst on his/her toes. He seemingly is able to work with anyone they throw at him. He works with Alex Rodriguez and that isn’t easy to do. Still, he’s able to navigate Baseball Road when A-Rod continuously wants to take him down A-Rod Avenue.  

DID YOU KNOW?

Vasgersian started his career as a child actor? I didn’t know that and I worked with him for a couple of years in San Diego.  Vasgersian appeared in an episode of “The Streets of San Francisco” and the movie “The Candidate” starring Robert Redford. 

Catching up with Matt Vasgersian: Even more Q&A where that came from — his  no-Twitter policy, 'The Chamber' fiasco and Boo Radley's house in Universal  Studios – Tom Hoffarth's The Drill: More

CONCLUSION

Vasgersian is a very talented guy, they just don’t give out high profile jobs to anyone. His success has been earned because he’s a hard-working person that constantly is honing his craft. His combination of pop culture, humor, sarcasm and wit are well balanced within his broadcasts, making them not only entertaining but informative. Isn’t that what it’s supposed to be all about anyway? 

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Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy of an Analyst: Bill Raftery

“There’s just an aura about this man. There is a passion and love for the sport of college basketball is evident every time he speaks, or shouts, or any combination of the two.”

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“Send it in!” “Big Fella!” “A little kiss!” Just some of the catch phrases shouted out by the silver haired basketball analyst Bill Raftery who has become entrenched as a voice of March Madness. His bookend “man-to-man” at the start of a broadcast and an “onions” at the end of one have become as beloved as that 15 seed who upsets a 2 seed in the tournament. 

Wednesday News and Notes could do without Bill Raftery - Banners On The  Parkway

Raftery was a star high school basketball player at Saint Cecilia in Kearny, New Jersey, winning a state championship in his senior year. He left as the school’s all-time leading scorer with 2,192 points, a record that held up for 35 years. Raftery played collegiately at La Salle University, scoring a freshman record 370 points, followed by a team best 17.8 points per game his sophomore year. The Explorers made the NIT in his senior year. Raftery was selected in the 14th round of the 1963 NBA draft by the Knicks, but never played in the league. 

Raftery began his coaching career in 1963 at Fairleigh Dickinson University, where he was the head basketball coach until 1968. He also coached golf and served as the associate athletic director. In 1970 he took over the Seton Hall program coaching them to a 154-141 record in his 11 seasons there. He took his team to the NIT in 1974 and 1977. 

HIS ROAD TO THE FINAL FOUR BROADCASTS

Before the 1981-82 season, Big East commissioner Dave Gavitt told Raftery there was an opportunity to call league games at ESPN. It was already late October, and Raftery had two days to decide. He gave up his coaching job with the Pirates and started broadcasting. Raftery stayed at ESPN doing games through the 2012 season. Also, in that span he started to emerge as an analyst on CBS’s college hoops. In 1991 he started working as an analyst for Westwood One/CBS Radio’s coverage of the Final Four. 

He also served as an analyst for the NBA’s New Jersey Nets. Since 1981, Raftery has announced several events, including the Big Ten Championship, the ACC Championship, the Big East Championship, the SEC Championship, the McDonald’s High School All-Star game and the NIT pre-season and championship games.

In 2015 Raftery was moved to the top announcing team, joining Grant Hill and Jim Nantz.  That was the first time he was able to call the Final Four on television and that team has been together ever since. 

NCAA Tournament 2019: First round start times, matchups, locations, tv,  announcer pairings, and more - Mid-Major Madness

WHY IS HE SO GOOD?

There’s just an aura about this man. There is a passion and love for the sport of college basketball is evident every time he speaks, or shouts, or any combination of the two. Raftery is great because of how conversational he is, very easy going and he seemingly can adapt to any play-by-play guy he’s paired with. There is something inherently likeable about how easy going he is during a broadcast. Don’t mistake that nature for a lack of excitement in his calls. If you did, you’d be wrong. He sounds like that older guy who’s experienced a lot in the game, but still is a kid at heart when calling a game. 

Yes, the man has catchphrases and sometimes he gets excitable when yelling them out, but he’s not over the top. He knows when to interject and when to lay back. In other words, he’s got some substance with his shtick. If you really listen, it’s not hard to tell that Raftery prepares for each and every broadcast. He knows what teams like to do in certain game situations, whether it be an inbounds play to get a good look, or a late-game situation or play. That’s only gleaned by attending practices or shootarounds and talking to the head coach and assistant coaches. He’ll keep a notepad near him with actual diagrams of those plays for better explaining purposes. 

With very little to zero ego, Raftery doesn’t set out to be the star of the show. He’s worked well with a two-man crew and a three-man booth.  

WHY HE’D BE FUN TO WORK WITH

His praises are sung by everyone he’s ever worked with.  “What you see on TV is what you get if you’re fortunate enough to be orbiting around Bill Raftery’s life,” Jim Nantz, who will call the Final Four and title game with Raftery and Grant Hill told the Athletic. “He exudes that love of life, that kindheartedness, that faith in people. It comes across on the air. You can’t fake that.” 

Boomer & Carton: Bill Raftery Provides The Onions, Talks Tourney – CBS New  York

Ian Eagle also spoke to the Athletic about Raftery, whom he worked with on Nets broadcasts and from time to time on NCAA game. “He’s a fountain of creativity,” Eagle says. “He also has an excellent sense of timing. Lots of people have tried to imitate his style, but nobody has matched it in all these years.” Eagle said. 

When guys of the stature of Nantz and Eagle are touting a guy like that, it’s completely credible. Because truthfully, Raftery has every right to think very highly of himself but doesn’t. He seems incredibly easy to work with. The kind of partner that would say something like, “whatever you want, I’ll just follow your lead, but I’d like to take us to break from time to time.” By the way, I love when Raftery takes the lead on sending the broadcast to commercial. The “roll-out” as it’s called, features some highlights just before they hit the ads, he’s like a kid in a candy store when he’s able to do it. 

He’s knowledgeable, easy going, vivacious and just seems to be having a great time – all the time. He is the kind of guy people like to talk to and meet. 

CONCLUSION

It wouldn’t be March Madness without Raftery. The transition he made from working with Verne Lundquist and with the Nets, to the top team with CBS has been seamless. That’s because of his personality and sense of timing. The phrases he uses are entertaining and fun to hear, due to the way he uses them.  Raftery is that guy sitting at the end of the bar, talking alongside the game, while making sure everybody’s glasses are filled and stay that way. 

CBS/Turner film on Bill Raftery, produced and directed by his son, will  debut April 2

Here’s to you Mr. Raftery, keep on doing what you do!

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Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy of an Analyst: Chris Webber

“Webber has the “it” factor when it comes to being an analyst. Knowledge of the game, personality and the ability to articulate what he sees in a concise manner.”

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He’s most famously known for being a part of the Michigan “Fab Five” teams of the early 1990’s. Chris Webber, Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard, Ray Jackson and Jimmy King all became Wolverines at the same time. The group went to 2 NCAA Finals, but lost both times. Webber took a lot of heat for the second of those losses. Facing North Carolina and down 2, he attempted to call a timeout, while the Wolverines had none, a technical foul was called and the Tarheels went on to the win. Webber would declare for the NBA Draft the next season.

Image result for chris webber

Webber grew up in Detroit. He played High School basketball at Detroit Country Day School and was the most recruited Michigan high school player since Magic Johnson. Webber led his school to 3 state championships, averaging nearly 30 points a game along with 13 rebounds. Then of course he went to Michigan for two years and was taken by the Orlando Magic with the first pick of the 2008 NBA Draft, he was immediately dealt to Golden State for Penny Hardaway and three future 1st round picks. He would later play for the Wizards, Kings, 76ers, Pistons and then back to Golden State where he would retire. Webber scored just over 17-thousand points and had over 8-thousand rebounds. He was a 5-time all-star. 

THE ROAD TO TNT/NBA ANALYST LIFE

After a 15-year NBA career, Webber began his new career, when he joined the Inside the NBA crew in 2008. Webber had an initiation ceremony upon joining the show. The established crew asked him a series of questions, including, “In college basketball how many timeouts do you get in a game?”. Webber responded, “I still don’t know the answer!”. With that he embarked on his broadcasting career that has seen him in the studio and courtside at games as an analyst for the NBA and the NCAA Tournament. 

Webber along with Reggie Miller are the main color commentators, working Thursday night games on the network. In 2015, he added NCAA basketball analysis to his resume, when Turner Sports became involved with CBS in the telecast of March Madness. 

WHY IS HE GOOD?

Webber, from all the games I’ve seen him do, is pretty smooth on the microphone. He articulates a point within the flow of a game and seems to work well with whomever he’s paired. I enjoy his candor when it comes to carefully calling out NBA players from time to time. He never makes it a personal attack; it’s about what a player may be doing within the framework of a game. I think he understands that because of course he played in the league. For example, he and Marv Albert were doing a game between the Rockets and Clippers just before the pandemic shut down in March of 2020. Houston frustrated Webber with its shot selection. 

“That’s the frustration with this Rockets team, you’ve got a step back three by House Jr, who should not be taking that shot, then on the other end you get a 3, that’s a six-point swing. Just because someone on paper says to take it, you need to understand your shooting percentage and how much realistically you can make it.”, said Webber. 

Makes sense to me and judging from the comments accrued on the YouTube page I watched the play on, Rockets fans agreed with the assessment. It seemed like Webber was channeling the frustration of a team’s fan base, articulating the point and having them all agree to an extent in this particular case. Some former players turned analyst are not as outright with their criticisms for fear of blowback. Webber straddles the line and doesn’t really cross it, especially in this instance. 

Webber seems to be a polarizing figure though overall. While some really enjoy his work, there are those that are not as enamored shall we say. It seems people have strong feelings, both ways, for the work he does on TNT. So much so there is an online petition started by a basketball fan “to ban Chris Webber from all TNT broadcasts moving forward.” The comments I read on the page range from “he has a total lack of care in regards to the fan experience…he is constantly off target in his analysis…” to the less thought out “Chris Webber sucks. That’s all”.

As we’ve mentioned in this column before, not everyone is going to be a fan of your work. This is not surprising at all. If you really look at it though, are they watching? They are compelled to react to what he’s saying, right? To me that makes him effective. Webber is stoking emotion in these fans and creating conversations. 

Image result for chris webber tnt

WHY HE’D BE FUN TO WORK WITH

To me it’s his sense of humor. Webber seems like he’s having a great time and isn’t afraid to poke a little fun at himself. Take this back and forth between Webber and Albert during Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals in 2015, between the Bulls and Cavaliers. In Game 4, Cleveland head coach David Blatt tried to call a time out, without any left, luckily an assistant coach stopped him and the refs didn’t see it. TNT flashed back with Albert describing the actions and what the consequences might have been. 

“Marv, I was going to interrupt you, I hope you aren’t explaining what happens when you call a time out to me, was that for everybody else?”, asked Webber.  “Yes, for everybody else.”, said Ablert. Then Marv asked the obvious question, “What went through your mind when you saw David Blatt call for the time out when he was out of time outs?”  Webber responded, “I wish had time to undo my wrong for my team 20 years ago. That’s exactly what went through my mind.” Later TNT showed a graphic with the rule about calling a TO without one, to which Webber deadpanned, “I don’t need to see it.”. 

That is a dynamite exchange. A sense of humor must run in the Webber family. Did you know his dad Mayce Sr. has a license plate that reads “TIMEOUT”, referring to his son’s famous miscue in the 1993 NCAA Finals. Great stuff. 

SOCIALLY AWARE

It’s not always fun and games though. Webber isn’t just a former basketball player and current television analyst. He’s a man in tune with the social issues facing not just the NBA but the country and world.

Webber was front and center on the night the NBA players staged a walk off, August 26, 2020, to protest the shooting of an African-American man Jacob Blake, in Kenosha, Wisconsin. The Milwaukee Bucks refused to take the court for a playoff game against the Magic in the Orlando bubble to protest the incident. The walkoff forced the postponement of all NBA games that night. The WNBA postponed 3 scheduled games that night and 3 MLB games were also called off. 

With no games to call, TNT used the airtime to discuss the civil unrest and shooting of Blake. Kenny Smith walked off the set in solidarity. Ernie Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal and Charles Barkley remained to further talk about what it all meant. Webber was in Orlando, getting ready to call a game, so they brought him into the show to get his thoughts. Webber was visibly shaken and was choking back tears. But he managed to make some very powerful statements. 

“I have a godson who has autism,” Webber said. “I just had to explain to him why we aren’t playing. I have young nephews who I’ve had to talk to about death before they’ve ever seen it in the movies. If not now, when? If not during the pandemic and countless lives being lost? If not now, when?”

“I keep hearing the question ‘What’s next?, What’s next?’. Well, you gotta plan what’s next. You have to figure out what’s next,” Webber continued. “Very proud of the players. I don’t know the next steps. Don’t really care what the next steps are, because the first steps are to garner attention, and they have everybody’s attention around the world right now. Then leadership and others will get together and decide the next steps.”

“Don’t listen to these people telling you don’t do anything because it’s not going to end right away,” Webber said. “You are starting something for the next generation and the next generation to take over.”

Pretty powerful stuff. 

CONCLUSION

Webber has the “it” factor when it comes to being an analyst. Knowledge of the game, personality and the ability to articulate what he sees in a concise manner. He works well with those that he’s paired with and you can tell they enjoy working with him. If all else fails for Webber, he could rely solely on his sense of humor. Don’t ever lose that Chris!  

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