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Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy of an Analyst: Jeff Van Gundy & Mark Jackson

The two men play off each other well, they seem to balance one another out. Calling each other out on things and eventually getting back to the game they’re watching.

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They’re names are synonymous with the NBA and basketball in general. Now it’s their voices that make you think of big games in the NBA on both ABC and ESPN. Mark Jackson and Jeff Van Gundy bring their knowledge of the game and personalities to the top announcing team alongside the new Hall of Famer, Mike Breen. The crew is getting ready to call the NBA Playoffs.

Analyst: NBA making 'huge mistake' on Christmas - The Boston Globe

Each of the analysts grew up around basketball and were bitten with the bug early in life. Each played high school and college basketball. Jackson with a little more success than Van Gundy in the playing department, but they were each able to parlay their respective successes into coaching jobs and top broadcasting gigs. 

Van Gundy grew up in California but played his high school ball in New York. As a high-school point guard, Van Gundy was a two-time All Greater Rochester selection in 1979 and 1980, leading Brockport Central to the Class AA finals. He continued his basketball playing career at Nazareth College, where he earned All-American honors, while leading the Golden Flyers to an NCAA Division III Tournament berth in 1984. Van Gundy then attended Yale University, where he was a classmate with 2-time Academy Award winner Jodie Foster. 

Jackson was born in Brooklyn, NY. He was regarded as one of the nation’s elite point guard prospects while attending Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School in Brooklyn. Jackson gained a reputation as a street baller in New York and a college hoops star at St. John’s University. While at St. John’s, he played alongside Olympian and NBA All-Star Chris Mullin for two seasons. He credits Mullin with teaching him the importance of rigorous practice work in the gym. 

NBA CREDENTIALS

Both left their mark on the NBA. Van Gundy as a head coach with the Knicks and Rockets. In a career that spanned 11 years and 748 games, he went 430-318, making the playoffs 9 times, reaching the NBA Finals in 1998-99, losing to the Spurs 4 games to 1. After getting fired from the Houston job in 2007, he joined ESPN as a guest analyst and has been with the network ever since. 

Jackson was drafted in the first round (#18 overall) by the Knicks in the 1987 NBA Draft. In a 17-year career he played for the Knicks (twice), Clippers, Pacers (twice), Nuggets, Raptors, Jazz and Rockets. Jackson was an All-Star in 1989, led the NBA in assists and assists per game in 1996-97. For his career Jackson averaged just under 10 points a game and 8 assists per contest. He spent 3 seasons as the head coach of the Golden State Warriors, going to the playoffs in all but his first year. After he was fired after the 2014 season, Jackson returned to ESPN/ABC to rejoin Breen and Van Gundy. 

BROADCASTING

I’m not usually a fan of the three-man booth. Sometimes too many cooks make for a bad broadcast. There are some exceptions along the way, and this group is one of them. The elements are all there, two well versed NBA analysts and a now Hall of Fame broadcaster. Just because all the ingredients are in place, it’s got to fit together or the food is still spoiled and tastes horrible. There is a chemistry between the three, it’s pretty much evident in every broadcast. There is a unique bond between the two analysts as well. 

The banter and comradery between them go back to when all three were with the Knicks. Because of their familiarity, the disagreements at times could sound heated on the air. But what you have to understand is that friends can take these liberties with each other and know exactly where that line is, and never cross it.

“I think because Mark took me under his wing early on, taught me a lot about the NBA, this deep friendship developed, that we can be honest with each other, we can disagree without being disagreeable,” Van Gundy told the Associated Press in 2019. “We’re real fortunate that we can talk honestly and not feel inhibited that we may be hurting each other’s feelings.” Jackson knows that too, Jackson knows that too, and told the AP “The same thing I would say at dinner, I would say courtside.” 

Mark Jackson and Jeff Van Gundy explain their on-air chemistry

Personalities such as these need to be big and bold. Neither of the analysts went to school to broadcast, so it’s been a work in progress for both. Van Gundy may be just 5 foot 9, but his presence is much larger. It’s come to be that NBA fans realize it’s a game of magnitude when he and Jackson join Breen on the call. Van Gundy has opinions and you will hear them during the game, that’s for sure. Sometimes it’s based on what he’s seeing in front of him, and sometimes it has nothing to do with the game at all. Van Gundy is not a fan of the modern statistics that have taken over sports in general, which doesn’t sit well with every fan. He also has a propensity to side with a coach when it comes to a margin call. But why wouldn’t he? 

Jackson is the guy that seems to egg Van Gundy on, encouraging him to continue whatever rant he may be on. Especially when it comes to things non-basketball related. But at the end of the day, Jackson brings a perspective to the proceedings. Having been a point-guard of note, there’s things he sees, that others may not. His play-by-play guy, Breen verbalized it better. “He sees the game like very few others,” Breen said to the Associated Press in 2019. “When he was a player, he had great court awareness. When he came back from coaching it gave him a different perspective and the ability to show what was going on with 10 players on the court.”

The two men play off each other well, they seem to balance one another out. Calling each other out on things and eventually getting back to the game they’re watching. They’ve been known to take things on a tangent or three during a game, which kind of leaves Breen to fend for himself. Having to try and bring the game back to the action, is not always easy. But that’s the job of the play-by-play guy for better or for worse. Van Gundy is usually the one that needs a little more reeling in, but what’s a guy to do?

“First off, I have no control to stop him,” Breen said to the USA Today. “I will fully admit that there have been many times when I’ve lost complete control of the broadcast or telecast. He [Van Gundy] loves to have fun. He loves to entertain himself, he loves to entertain me and Mark and he loves to entertain the audience”, said Breen. “So, he knows what he’s doing. And he knows when it’s time to concentrate on basketball. He has such a respect and love of the game that he knows when it’s time. And when one team’s up 35, that’s not the time.”

CONCLUSION

The duo of color commentators isn’t everyone’s cup of coffee. Some have compared them to Statler and Waldorf, the Muppets that sit in the balcony and offer up grumpy opinions and heckle the rest of the cast. There is some grumpiness in the analysis and on occasion there’s a heckle or two. If you are a basketball fan, there is a way to look/listen beyond the extraneous observations and appreciate the information.

Statler and Waldorf and the Gift of Now | John Boyko

The broadcast does offer a nice balance. Jackson and Van Gundy “police” themselves if you will and Breen has an incredible way of actually bringing it back to the action. It works, in a unique way. Sometimes you have to be able to read between the lines. But, after all, in the television world it’s all about entertainment, right? Whether you like them or not, you talk about them and tune in to watch. That’s a win for the broadcast. 

Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy Of A Broadcaster: Rick Allen

“Not only is he high-energy, he’s accurate, smooth and has a very confident and commanding style.”

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In my “Anatomy of a Broadcaster” series, I’ve basically stuck to the Big 4 (Baseball, Basketball, Football and Hockey). I figured it was time to branch out a bit and tackle one of the more popular sports in America, NASCAR.

I have to admit, I’m not a huge racing fan, but many of you that read this column are, so let’s start our engines on this “Anatomy” by focusing on Rick Allen of NBC Sports. 

Allen fulfilling lifelong dream to call Verizon IndyCar Series race
Courtesy: NASCAR Illustrated

Allen grew up in Grand Island, Nebraska, and was an athlete in college. He was a walk-on for the University of Nebraska Track and Field team and was one of those great success stories. He wound up as a letter winner all four seasons, was a three-time All-American in the sport, winning two Big Eight Conference decathlon titles (1991–92). Not too shabby for a non-scholarship athlete. 

He received his bachelor’s degree of communications from the university. After graduation, he worked as a public address announcer for the University of Nebraska athletic department. He was heard on the PA system at Memorial Stadium, where the Cornhuskers football team played. This was a time where Nebraska dominated the football landscape and a 24-year-old Allen was in the spotlight, heard by hundreds of thousands of fans in the early to mid ’90s. His work at the school led him to racing. He was asked by a Nebraska Alum and donor to do the PA at a racetrack just purchased by the donor. Eagle Raceway is where it all started for Allen. 

ROAD TO NBC/NASCAR

Rick’s path to the booth was pretty unique. He never really intended to announce races when he was a student. But the opportunity afforded to him by the owner of the Eagle Raceway, set the tire rolling down the track for him. 

Allen recalled last year to a Nebraska TV station WOWT, “A NASCAR official came to me during my second year of announcing out there, and said send my demo tape in because FOX Sports and NBC Sports were taking over the broadcasts for NASCAR, and I didn’t know anything about NASCAR, so I didn’t send a tape in and about two weeks later they said hey you really need to send a tape in, they are interested,” said Allen.

From 2003 to mid-2014, Allen worked for Fox Sports, where his main duty was calling the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series and ARCA Racing Series on SPEED-TV and later Fox Sports 1. He occasionally covered Nationwide Series events as well.  

In December of 2013, it was announced that Allen would become the lead announcer for NASCAR on NBC starting in 2015. He actually started some work with NBC in 2014, hosting their daily studio show, NASCAR America while he was still at Fox. His last Truck Series race for Fox was in July of 2014. 

As part of the NBC family, Allen has been able to show his versatility as a broadcaster. He’s been called upon as a play-by-play announcer for the network’s coverage of USA Track and Field Indoor and Outdoor Championships. He also calls the Millrose Games, the Boston Marathon, and the World Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field Championships on NBC Sports. Makes sense since he was a three-time All-America in the sport, right? 

In the racing off-season, Allen calls Atlantic 10 Men’s Basketball games on the NBC family of networks.

WHY IS HE SO GOOD?

I had to do a little research to find out why Allen is so good at what he does. Viewing several of his races and learning about his path, it wasn’t hard to figure out why. Allen first and foremost is a student of the racing game. Never intending to be in the position he is now, he had to work to familiarize himself with the sport and learn along the way. Not just about NASCAR but how to broadcast it. 

During the same interview I referenced earlier with the Nebraska TV Station WOWT, he recalled a race in 2003. It was a NASCAR Truck Series race and it was a three-wide photo finish. Exciting right? I should point out that this race was held at the Daytona Motor Speedway. Allen, feeling all of the excitement in the air and of the finish he just saw, almost made a big gaffe. He told the station that he almost proclaimed Rick Crawford the winner of the Daytona 500. Nope. Wouldn’t have been true. So, when you listen back to the call of the actual result of the race, Allen says, “Rick Crawford wins the Daytona”, and after a pause of 5 seconds or so, “250”.  All good. 

The other thing that struck me by watching some races over the years is his very confident and upbeat style. He’s taken some criticism for what some perceive as him “yelling” all the time. I felt it was appropriate in almost every situation. See, he’s working with Dale Earnhardt Junior and Junior is always upbeat in the booth. Earnhardt the former driver himself, knows a lot about the sport and is one of the most hyped-up analysts around. As a play-by-play announcer, you have to try and match that energy. Matching it without sounding completely phony is a tough chore. Allen pulls it off. 

Not only is he high-energy, he’s accurate, smooth and has a very confident and commanding style. He’s in control of his broadcast and while that amped-up style may not be for everyone, to me the sport almost demands it. These are cars traveling around a track, bunched up, going over 200 miles an hour. It’s exciting just to watch what is happening and the sounds of the track are loud and the announcer has to be able to relay the excitement in his voice. The broadcast team also seems to really enjoy each other’s company. That’s important. 

The educational style of the broadcast is interesting as well. Not having grown up myself as a racing fan, I was drawn to how Allen explains things. Even the novice gains some education and I don’t think the rabid fans get offended by the simplistic nature of some of the commentary. 

In an interview with “i80 Sportsblog” Allen explained that’s all part of NBC’s approach to their NASCAR coverage. “If you didn’t grow up in racing and get introduced to the sport via your family, how would you ever get introduced? Our goal is to explain it in an easy, conversational way.”

NASCAR on NBC crew wants to point out all that is at stake in the Monster  Energy playoffs
Courtesy: Hendrick Motorsports

Mission accomplished. 

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Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy Of A Broadcaster: Michael Kay

“Kay isn’t afraid to call it like he sees it, even if that means blasting the Yankees, an individual player or the opposing team.”

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Dreams do come true, just ask Yankees TV announcer Michael Kay. He grew up ten minutes from Yankee Stadium. He was a huge Yankees fan, so much so, that in Little League he’d wear number 1 for his favorite player, Bobby Murcer. Once he realized that a career as the Yankees’ first baseman wasn’t going to materialize, the dream turned to becoming a broadcaster for the team. To get there, Kay did all the school reports he could about the Yankees, so he could know all about them. Now many years later it’s his job to know all he can about the team. 

Sportsmedia column: Michael Kay braces for new world of MLB broadcasting
Courtesy: YES Network

Kay attended Fordham University and worked for the radio station WFUV, thinking it was the best place for him to pursue the dream. He was there with another guy that dreamed of a play-by-play career, Mike Breen, the voice of the NBA on ABC/ESPN. 

In 1992, the lifelong ambition became a reality as he joined John Sterling in the Yankees radio booth. He would spend a decade on radio, then transition to television with the advent of the YES Network. He became the main play-by-play guy for the network in 2002. So now, Kay is in his 30th year with the team as a broadcaster.  

ROAD TO YANKEES BOOTH

Kay started his professional career with the New York Post in 1982 as a general assignment writer. He had sports assignments from college basketball and the NBA, covering the New Jersey Nets. Kay worked himself up at the paper and received the Yankees’ beat writing assignment in 1987. 

In 1989, Kay left the Post for the Daily News, still covering the Yankees as his primary beat. Kay also served as the Madison Square Garden Network Yankee reporter starting in 1989. 

Kay left the Daily News to host a sports talk show on WABC in 1992, briefly returning to write “Kay’s Korner” for the Daily News in 1993, before taking the microphone job for radio broadcasts of New York Yankee games beside John Sterling. 

BUSY GUY

Kay manages to find time to do many things, aside from calling Yankees games. He hosts The Michael Kay Show weekdays from 2-6:30pm on ESPN Radio 98.7 FM and simulcast on the YES Network. The show started in 2002, the same year he started as the voice of the Yankees on TV. 

The show is now co-hosted by Don La Greca and Peter Rosenberg. Kay and La Greca have been paired on ESPN New York since 2002, with the duo working to build a successful sports radio show in a tough market over the course of two decades. Rosenberg, the show’s third voice, joined in 2015.

In March TMKS moved up an hour to give Kay more time with the New York audience. But that means an extra hour away from preparing for that night’s Yankees game. Kay will look through his Yankees notes and other things to get ready for the game, during long commercial blocks on his radio show. If there is a game to call, Kay will leave the radio show anywhere from 5:45 to 6pm, with co-hosts La Greca and Rosenberg left to close out the show. 

He’s also the host of CenterStage on the YES Network. He interviews some of the biggest names in sports, entertainment and politics for the last two decades. Kay has even collected some of his favorite moments from on and off camera into a book “CenterStage: My Most Fascinating Interviews – From A-Rod to Jay-Z.”

CenterStage | Book by Michael Kay | Official Publisher Page | Simon &  Schuster

I’m not entirely sure how Kay manages this schedule. I know that the first time I was asked to host an hour-long pregame show before a game broadcast, the feeling in my stomach was not good. How could I do this show and get ready for a game that night? It meant getting to the ballpark earlier, using time between segments wisely and then getting some good exercise. I’d have to maneuver through the crowd from the home studio down the left field line, to the broadcast booth behind home plate. Stressful. 

My point is, for Kay to be able to call a Yankees game, after having been on the air already for 3-4 hours is something to marvel at. I’m sure he would tell you that a lot of the prep work comes from some of the topics on his show. He’s likely already up on the latest information regarding the Yankees and he’s pretty versed by then about what is happening elsewhere in the world of sports. Still, I admire his ability to be as busy as he is and still be sharp on his play-by-play. 

WHAT MAKES HIM SO GOOD

There is a conversational style by Kay that sets him apart from others. He doesn’t have that “typical” broadcasting voice, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. He seems to speak to Yankees fans as a Yankees fan. Make sense? I mean he’s rooting for the team and he’s not pleased when they aren’t doing well. You can tune into a Yankees telecast and before you even see the score, you can tell by his tone, who’s winning and who’s not. Kay is a true hometown broadcaster and people in New York crave that. He’s happy when the viewer is obviously happy, and not when they aren’t. 

Having a highly rated sports talk show helps with that delivery. Hosts are supposed to have that conversational, passionate and easy to listen to style. You talk with your audience as opposed to talking “at” them. Sports talk hosts want to build that relationship with an audience, making them feel like the host is one of them so to speak. This holds true with a baseball announcer trying to develop that same relationship. Kay truly is one of them and while his style may not work for others, it definitely works for him. 

Kay is a throwback of sorts as well. There aren’t too many true “homers” left in booths across the country. Yes, broadcasters of local teams, scream and yell more when their team is doing well, but if their local 9 isn’t playing well, choosing the right words can be challenging. Not too many announcers have free reign to criticize their own club. Gone are the days of Harry Caray and Marty Brennaman who would frequently call out their own team and its players for a variety of things. Both had built up so much equity with the teams and fan base they were free to do and say what they wanted.  

Kay isn’t afraid to call it like he sees it, even if that means blasting the Yankees, an individual player or the opposing team. He sees it as being honest with the viewer/listener. As he told the Sports Media with Richard Deitsch” podcast, Kay doesn’t think there is anybody more critical of the team they broadcast than he is and he credits the Yankees for allowing him to do that.

“The reason I can do it is that the Yankees never say a word because they realize the value of honesty. If you are going to tell people the food stinks, then they are going to believe you when they tell you the food is great. There are so many people around the country that are blowing smoke constantly and I guess that’s what the fanbase wants. I don’t think that would play in New York. I think honesty plays in New York.” 

CRITICIZING AND BEING CRITICIZED 

In his 30-year career, Kay has done his share of criticizing. In April he went off on the Yankees for using an “opener”, Nick Nelson, in a critical game against the Rays. 

“You’re the best-looking guy at the party. Don’t try to be the smartest. Why couldn’t they start Michael King? Why were they getting cute by starting Nick Nelson, who gave up two runs and they never looked back? Why? Why were you doing that? In your organization, you don’t have another starter? It’s almost the same thing as what you did in the Division Series. You started Deivi Garcia and brought in J.A. Happ. Don’t try to outsmart the Rays!”

So, when you criticize you open yourself up for it to come back to you. He’s had back-and-forth run-ins with players on his own team, like Clint Frazier. Most recently as a result of commentary on his talk show, he’s gone toe-to-toe with Mets’ pitcher Marcus Stroman.

The funny thing is Kay claims he has thin skin. Again, speaking on the “Sports Media with Richard Deitsch” podcast he admitted to such. His inclination is to fight back, but sometimes it’s not the best way to go about it. 

Courtesy: ESPN Images

“People that criticize people do not like to be criticized. My skin is so thin, it is translucent. If I mess up a call and you say wow, Michael messed up a call. Bring it, I deserve it. When you say stuff just the way I do stuff or something that rubs you the wrong way, it bothers me. I don’t understand the meanness of it.” Kay told the podcast.

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS/CALLS

Working for an organization like the Yankees lends itself to a broadcaster having some memorable calls. This is true in the case of Kay, who got to watch Derek Jeter, Bernie Williams, Mariano Rivera, Tino Martinez, Mark Teixeira, Jason Giambi, Jorge Posada, Aaron Judge and even Alex Rodriguez play many baseball games. One of Kay’s most memorable came in 2011. 

Derek Jeter’s 3000th hit came on a home run, July 9, 2011:

“The 3-2, that one’s drilled to deep left field, going back Joyce, looking up, See ya! 3000! History with an exclamation point! Oh, what a way to join the 3000-hit club! Derek Jeter has done it, in grand style!” 

If you’ve ever wondered, where his home run call, “see ya!” came from, well in 2018 he joined the Dan Patrick Show and explained the origin:

“I got this job 27 years ago, and at the time I was dating a young lady who, when she would get out of the car at the end of a date, she would say ‘see ya, wouldn’t want to be ya!’ And I said, ‘you know, I’m going to hijack that as my home-run call. So, I’ve been doing it since the very beginning of when I got the job in 1992.”

File:Michael Kay.jpg - Wikipedia

CONCLUSION

Kay is a multimedia superstar in New York and just keeps on going. His uniqueness is in his ability to juggle a top-rated talk show and call games for one of the iconic franchises in sports history is amazing to me. To actually be able to do BOTH jobs at such a high level sets him apart. Kay has carved out his own style and it works for both him and Yankees fans alike. 

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Anatomy of a Broadcaster

Anatomy of An Analyst: Louis Riddick

“The experiences Riddick has had over the length of his career are irreplaceable when it comes to his analysis of the sport.”

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From the field to the front office to your television, Louis Riddick is all about one thing: Football. Riddick along with his boothmates, Steve Levy and Brian Griese, will be back for a second season of ESPN’s Monday Night Football. Riddick got solid reviews and they were well deserved. He and Griese seamlessly worked together as co-analysts, which is not an easy thing to do. 

Breaking down ESPN's new 'Monday Night Football' booth, Fox and CBS NFL  announcers in 2020 | Sporting News
Courtesy: ESPN Images

Riddick is a native of Quakertown, Pennsylvania and graduated from the University of Pittsburgh. He was a four-year letterman and a two-time Academic All-America. Riddick was a ninth-round draft choice of the San Francisco 49ers in 1991, and played seven NFL seasons at safety. His career included stints with the Falcons, Browns and Raiders. When his playing career came to an end, Riddick moved into the front office. His experience spanned more than a decade with the Washington Football Team and Philadelphia Eagles. He started as a pro scout in Washington before being promoted to director of pro personnel, a position he held for three years. Riddick then joined the Eagles in 2008 as a scout. He was named assistant director of pro personnel in 2009, and, a year later, he was promoted to director of pro personnel.

ROAD TO MONDAY NIGHT BOOTH

Riddick started at ESPN in May of 2013 as an NFL Front Office Insider. His role has expanded seemingly every year since. In 2015, he made his debut on the network’s NFL Draft coverage in Chicago. He was supposed to cover the draft for ESPN Radio, but when riots broke out in Baltimore, Ray Lewis went back to the city and the network needed a replacement. Since Riddick was going to be in Chicago anyway, he was going to be the guy. The network informed him the night before the draft was set to begin. 

“When we started the draft that night, within the first 20 minutes, I looked down at my phone and I probably had about 75 to 90 text messages from co-workers, friends, family and former coaches”, Riddick recalled to the Philly Voice. “I thought I was either doing really bad, or I was doing really well. It turned out really positive. I remember going back to my hotel room in Chicago that night thinking, ‘Here we go.’ That’s when it took off in my mind that I can do this.”

Riddick has been a fixture of ESPN’s draft coverage on the main set ever since. He opened up a new world for himself in Bristol. Riddick began contributing to many of their signature NFL Shows. Sunday NFL Countdown, Monday Night Countdown, and NFL Live, as well as SportsCenter and ESPN Radio. 

Riddick also worked Friday Night College Football game broadcasts, which showcased his ability to analyze a live game. Even before settling into the current MNF booth, Riddick worked with his booth mates, on September 9, 2019, when they helped kick off MNF’s 50th season and called the Denver Broncos-Oakland Raiders game for ESPN.

The following year, after a shakeup, Riddick, Griese and Levy were called to take over the iconic franchise. They will return for a second season this year. 

WHY IS HE SO GOOD?

He’s got the credentials and the chops to be very good at what he does. The experiences Riddick has had over the length of his career are irreplaceable when it comes to his analysis of the sport. It’s almost a situation of when Riddick talks, people listen, just like that old investment company’s commercial. It’s not just the information he disseminates, it’s the timing and conviction in which he speaks. 

Riddick also plays well off of both Levy and Griese. The latter of course played the game but also has a little more experience in the booth and a different comfort level. That’s probably why you don’t see Riddick breaking down plays with a telestrator, it’s more “I’ve seen this”, “I used to run this”, or “when I was in Philadelphia, we stressed this.” The words stand alone and have power based upon having been there and done that. 

The other thing that’s striking about Riddick in this booth, is the way he and Griese converse throughout a game. It’s great football talk at a “human” level. Riddick presents the complex breakdowns of coverages, schemes and plays in a manner that is technical, yet not overly so. That’s not an easy thing to do when you are a former football player first and broadcaster second. Terminology within a locker room or front office is geared to those in the know and pretty much only those folks. A broadcast has to be treated differently and Riddick gets it. He talks to his audience, not above them or below them. He has a way of explaining things so the casual fan can follow along. He can also get it done in a concise manner, since time is critical, especially in a three-man booth. Not a skill everyone can pull off. 

There is confidence in his commentary. The delivery is clear and authoritative, commanding respect, but yet it’s not overly cocky or arrogant. He works well with his ‘teammates’ in the booth and you can feel the healthy respect each has for the other. 

BACK TO FRONT OFFICE WORK?

Off of those points, there is a question that needs to be asked and answered. Just how long will Riddick remain in the booth? The answer is not entirely clear, but based on how many teams interviewed him for front office positions this offseason, it may not be long. Riddick has made no secret of his desire to return to the NFL, this time he’d like to be a general manager. 

Louis Riddick - ESPN Press Room U.S.
Courtesy: ESPN Images

The Lions, Texans, Jaguars and Falcons talked to him about vacant GM positions, but nothing materialized. Riddick wouldn’t be the first guy to leave the MNF booth for a spot in the NFL. Jon Gruden returned to the sidelines with the Raiders in part because of his commentary and analysis from that booth. But like Gruden, Riddick has to feel like the opportunity is a good fit and the right situation for him. He has a great gig now, so something would probably have to blow him away to lure him away from MNF. 

DID YOU KNOW?

I’ll bet you didn’t know, Riddick won use of Washington Football Team owner Dan Snyder’s Aston Martin.  Riddick worked in the scouting and pro personnel departments for the WFT and had the occasion to play Snyder in racquetball. He appeared on “the ESPN Daily podcast’ earlier this year to recall the story. 

“I used to whup him pretty good,” Riddick remembered. “And I used to talk to [Snyder], like ‘Are you gonna challenge me today or what? Is this gonna be a game? I’m getting bored with you.’

“He goes, ‘If you can shut me out’ — he had just bought the new V12 Vanquish Aston Martin, brand-new — ‘If you can shut me out, I’ll let you take that home.’ I was like, ‘Deal!’ I went down there to the racquetball courts and was like, “Bam, bam, bam bam!’ 11-nothing. Boom. Just like that. And he was pissed. PISSED.”

Riddick wasn’t sure that Snyder would honor the bet after a few weeks without acknowledgment of the events. But the Football Team owner finally paid up and gave him the keys to the Aston Martin.

“If you scratch it,” said Snyder, “I’ll be commandeering your salary forever.”

Aston Martin Vanquish & Vanquish S (2001 - 2007) | Aston Martin | Aston  Martin
Courtesy: Aston Martin

Riddick didn’t get to keep the car. He got to use it for three days, enough time to drive it home, impress his neighbors and his wife. Riddick was a sight to behold at the team’s headquarters when he would roll up, driving the owner’s car and parking in his personal space.

CONCLUSION

Riddick is a football guy; he knows what he’s talking about. I really enjoy his commentary from the booth and when he appears on ESPN’s draft coverage. He’s such a credible voice and is in many cases the voice of reality. That’s his schtick, it’s not to be noticed for extremely high energy or random ‘hot takes’, he’s based with his feet firmly planted on the ground. He works in facts and opinions based on factual information. A refreshing breath of fresh air. Give me that any day of the week.

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