Connect with us
Register for the BSM Summit Now

News Print & Digital

The Daily Beast Writes Scathing Eulogy of Donald Rumsfeld

Published

on

Photo/Reuters

“The only thing tragic about the death of Donald Rumsfeld is that it didn’t occur in an Iraqi prison.”

Spencer Ackerman, a Contributing Editor for The Daily Beast, did not bury the lede while writing a “eulogy” for Donald Rumsfeld. The former United States secretary of defense passed away on Wednesday at the age of 88.

Ackerman continues by chronicling numerous occasions where Rumsfeld’s overtly militant mentality cost hundreds of thousands of people their lives.

This passage recalls an interaction with American troops in Kuwait in 2004:

“But to those forces, for whom he was responsible, he was no less indifferent. In Kuwait in December 2004, National Guardsmen preparing for deployment confronted Rumsfeld in the hope of enlisting his help with a dire circumstance. They were scrounging through scrap heaps for metal to weld onto their insufficiently armored vehicles so the RPGs they were sure to encounter wouldn’t kill them. Rumsfeld let it be known that the war mattered, not the warfighter. “You go to war with the Army you’ve got, not the Army you might want or wish to have at a later time,” he replied.”

Ackerman is well versed reporting matters of national security. He served as ‘U.S. national security editor’ for the Guardian and is soon releasing a book titled “REIGN OF TERROR: How The 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump.

The opinion piece ends with a mic drop.

“How frail was this man who can lay claim to the deaths of at least 415,000 people, and how bitter it is that unlike them, his name will be remembered, even in infamy.”

News Print & Digital

Hallie Jackson Says New Show Is “For People Who Like the News”

Jackson spoke with InStyle, where she discussed the type of show that the audience can expect as she covers general news, not politics. 

Published

on

NBC News and MSNBC political journalist Hallie Jackson kicked off her new show, “Hallie Jackson Now,” on the streaming platform NBC News Now

Jackson spoke with InStyle, where she discussed the type of show that the audience can expect as she covers general news, not politics. 

With news stories flying under the radar due to the 24/7 news cycle of cable news, Jackson looks for stories that should be discussed but might not get the attention on cable news.

Despite being on the ground and covering Washington politics, her new show allows her to get out of her comfort zone and a chance to attempt different ways of telling the story.

“This is the news for people who like the news,” Jackson said. The program is divided into segments, allowing Jackson to jump deeper into specific stories. 

“We are really trying to figure out how we can peel back the curtain a little bit, tear down that fourth wall,” Jackson said. “The idea is: let’s talk like normal human beings, just have a conversation the way that normal humans would actually speak and talk.”

Continue Reading

News Print & Digital

The United States, China Relax Visa Restrictions on Reporters

“We are gratified their correspondents will be able to return to the PRC to continue their important work,” the State Department said

Published

on

The United States and China have reached an agreement to relax visa restrictions on each countries foreign reporters, per The New York Times.

“We are gratified their correspondents will be able to return to the PRC to continue their important work,” the State Department said in a statement. “We welcome this progress but see it simply as initial steps.”

Former President Donald J. Trump’s tensions with China were at the core of the restrictions following his comments regarding the coronavirus and how it originated, resulting in China expelling journalists working for the three American papers. 

Trump would respond by limiting Chinese journalists to 90-day visas to work in the United States. 

Despite news breaking on Tuesday, both parties have been cooperating for months and agree to give journalists eligible under the countries’ laws yearlong visas that are renewable. 

“They were trying to find some area where they could show some concrete progress,” Orville Schell, the director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society, said. “They decided that this was a good one.”

Continue Reading

News Print & Digital

Alex Jones Liable by Default in Sandy Hook Defamation Suit

The families of Sandy Hook victims are suing Jones in both Texas and Connecticut courts

Published

on

Infowars founder Alex Jones has lost another defamation lawsuit pertaining to his claims regarding the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary mass shooting. A Connecticut state court found Jones liable by default handing a victory to the families of eight people killed. 

The reason for Judge Barbara Bellis giving this verdict is due to Jones not handing over financial and analytics data requested on various occasions by the Sandy Hook family plaintiffs.

“All the defendants have failed to fully and fairly comply with their discovery obligations,” Bellis said.

The families of Sandy Hook victims are suing Jones in both Texas and Connecticut courts over his past claims where he stated that the tragedy was a hoax and that it was a staged event. Jones has since admitted that the shooting did occur.

“While the families are grateful for the Court’s ruling, they remain focused on uncovering the truth. As the Court noted, Alex Jones and his companies have deliberately concealed evidence of the relationship between what they publish and how they make money,” Chris Mattei of Koskoff, Koskoff & Bieder, which represents the plaintiffs said. 

“Mr. Jones was given every opportunity to comply but, when he chose instead to withhold evidence for more than two years, the Court was left with no choice but to rule as it did today. While today’s ruling is a legal victory, the battle to shed light on how deeply Mr. Jones has harmed these families continues.”

The cases will now transition to a hearing and damages. Jones did address the verdict on his Monday show. “We need to defend all of our speech rights to say whatever it is we wish. That’s the First Amendment,” Jones said. 

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2021 Barrett Media.