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Mark Levin Provides Another Masterpiece with New Book

Levin pumps out books, radio programs and television content at a pace rarely seen in modern mass media.

Rick Schultz

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Another book, another runaway success. 

Mark Levin pumps out books, radio programs, and television content at a pace rarely seen in modern mass media. And once again, he is firmly entrenched atop the charts.

As much as it pains the liberal mass media, Levin’s most recent book, American Marxism, is already a runaway hit among scholars, Constitutionalists, and traditional readers across the nation. The book recently surpassed a million copies sold, while also remaining as the country’s top-selling book on the New York Times’ nonfiction list for more than 10 weeks straight. In fact, when it was released this summer, the book sold a staggering 700,000 copies in the first three weeks alone.

And it’s not like this one is a fluke. All 8 of Levin’s previous books have been bestsellers, evidence of his impact on wide swaths of the American reading public. This includes the highly-regarded 2007 title, Rescuing Sprite, which took an emotional look at his family’s special relationship with a remarkable rescue dog.

This year’s release from Levin, American Marxism, follows up on his runaway 2009 hit, Liberty and Tyranny, in which he detailed the radical leftward turn taken by Barack Obama and the Democrats. In his new book, Levin argues how liberal Democrats have largely won in solidifying their extreme policies and Marxist ideals into all areas of American life.  Levin, as always, defends traditional American Constitution-based values and writes “The counter-revolution to the American Revolution is in full force. And it can no longer be dismissed or ignored for it is devouring our society and culture, swirling around our everyday lives, and ubiquitous in our politics, schools, media, and entertainment.”

Levin says exposing this philosophy and its deleterious effects is key for the 2022 elections and for keeping America as a strong, prosperous force for good in the world. 

“We’re running out of time. You know, there are tens of millions of people in this country who have no voice in academia, the media, Big Tech, even in politics. And we’re not going to roll over and play dead,” Levin said in Paul Bedard’s Washington Secrets column on Thursday. 

Bedard wrote that the book tackles the Left’s attempt to rewrite U.S. history, take over American institutions, and erase conservatism.

In July, on his Fox News program, Life, Liberty, and Levin, Levin placed stacks of books on his desk, telling his audience they were just a small fraction of the books available “about what’s going on in our classrooms, in our colleges and universities,” but about which “we haven’t been paying attention.” 

“Throughout our culture, whether it’s newsrooms, whether it’s entertainment, whether it’s academia, the Democrat party, this ideology, what I call American Marxism, has been spawned from Marxism. It has been Americanized,” Levin said. “It has been used to try and use our differences, our imperfections, to exploit them to drive this ideology.”

As he’s done on television and radio for years, Levin then followed with an exhaustive list of examples of “American Marxism” in modern-day America. And as always, he believes the solutions for most of the country’s problems can be found in re-orienting around our founding principles and once-uniting values.

Levin’s recent chapter of publishing success comes as he announced last week that he recently received a cardiac stent in his ongoing battle with heart disease. But the 64-year-old says his health will not stand in the way of him continuing to fight for America against Marxist policies forced on citizens by Democrats.

“All of this, all of a sudden is appearing, but the foundation for these movements, these American Marxist movements, these offshoots from Marxism, they’ve been in place for decades,” he said in July. “It’s just that they are appearing now in a big way.”

BNM Writers

Shari Elliker Credits Improvisational Work for Helping Career

Elliker credits the improvisational work for helping her career. Recognizing how to respond, go with whatever is happening in the moment. 

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Shari Elliker has an extensive array of experience in radio in some major markets. Currently, she is co-host of the John Curley and Shari Elliker Show on KIRO-FM in Seattle from 3-6 pm PST.

While that’s all fine and well, that’s not what intrigued me the most. What about her portrayal of fictitious anchorperson Andrea Tandy on the HBO series, Veep?

“I auditioned for the part,” Elliker said. “I didn’t think much about it until I got a call from the casting director telling me the director of the episode really wanted me for the role.”

That was great news, but Elliker had other responsibilities she’d committed to. 

At the time, she was working with the National Assessment of Educational Progress (what Elliker referred to as basically a report card for the nation for grades 4-8). 

“The episode of Veep was set to be shot in Howard County, Maryland,” Elliker recalled, “and they had the whole soundstage up there. The casting director called me back, and again she told me the director really liked me and asked if there was some way I could make it work.”

Elliker figured it was worth a shot, called the production company, and told them they were her first priority but wondered if she could make the taping. They told her it was no problem and they could do what they’d planned with her at another time.

All was set for the filming, and Elliker aced it.

“I was thrilled,” Elliker said. “During shooting, I had papers in front of me, as any anchor person would. That was lucky as I was able to look down if I got stuck on a line.”

Elliker said while it was fun, she wasn’t thinking of it as a ‘big break’ in Hollywood. The production company didn’t stay in Maryland much longer.

“I don’t think they had any plans to expand my role, and the Maryland film incentives had dried up.”

She did tape three additional episodes of Veep and one more voice-over for the production. 

Then, as quickly as they came, the Veep production pulled up stakes and headed back to California.

Attending the University of Maryland, Elliker was the GM of WUMD. The school had two radio stations; one in College Park, Maryland, and the other in Baltimore, where she went to school. Elliker originally wanted to be a film major. After a couple of Super 8 projects, she realized that wouldn’t happen. 

“One of my Super-8 projects was about a guy I had a crush on in the dorms. Another was about a sandwich that made itself. Not Fellini stuff.”

With the film dream as vapid as Alex Jones and Infowars, Elliker knew she had to think quickly. Finishing school quickly was a goal, so she switched to communications.

“I learned a lot being on the air at WUMD. They didn’t have what you’d call a robust communications program. It wasn’t even called ‘communication.’ It was more of a hybrid option. It was interdisciplinary where you’d design your own curriculum.” 

Later, Elliker joined a political satire group in D.C., Gross National Product. 

In 1988, GNP launched Scandal Tours, an insider’s bus tour of the sites that have made Washington infamous, and highlighted shady characters like Gary Hart, Fanny Foxe, Marilyn Monroe, and the White House JFK practically turned into a Motel 6.  Elliker played Fawn Hall and Rita Jennrette. 

“Tourists would get on a bus, and the players would wear costumes and act out the scandals,” Elliker said. “We’d run to the back of the bus, hop in the bathroom and change our clothes. Then we’d run back to the front of the bus and grab the microphone.” 

GNP also did stage shows out of The Bayou, a club in Georgetown.

“It was a little like Second City, but more political,” Elliker said. “We’d make fun of both sides, but we weren’t mean-spirited. In 1992 it was easier to poke fun at everything. We did a lot of President George Bush jokes, Dan Quayle jokes.” 

Elliker credits the improvisational work for helping her career. Recognizing how to respond, go with whatever is happening in the moment. 

“I imagine those skills are helpful no matter what business you go into.”

“I was also doing dumb industrial films playing roles like a postal worker,” Elliker said. “One time I was a heroin addict looking for government cheese. Not sure how that ended.” 

Now we come to traffic reporting. Elliker said back in the 90s, traffic reporters were ubiquitous. She wanted to do voiceovers, and a good way to get work would be to get her name recognized. 

“I figured if I got my name out there somehow, it would end up being beneficial,” she said. In a brash move, Elliker called the Metro traffic manager in D.C. and the regional manager happened to be there. 

“I told him I was wondering how one becomes a traffic reporter. He told me I had a nice voice and to send a tape. I taped a  traffic broadcast, then recorded myself reciting the information verbatim.”

It worked. The regional manager told Elliker they needed someone to report on traffic at the Bay Bridge in Maryland, near the Eastern Shore.

“It was beach traffic and the job was god-awful,” Elliker recalls. “Large trucks would downshift in the middle of my report. This went on for the entire summer, and I knew this wasn’t for me.”

Now that reporting traffic was in the dumper, the famous Don and Mike Show called her out of the blue. They had a traffic reporter on maternity leave and asked Elliker if she’d do an afternoon drive until they could find a replacement.

Nope.

“I said I wasn’t going to do an afternoon drive.”

Then, maybe. 

“I thought about it and figured what’s the worst they could do? Talk mean to me? Make fun of me?  I called them back and said I’d do it for a couple of days, and to my surprise, they were really nice and kind to me. I ended up getting the job and did it for four years, becoming part of the ensemble cast. I very much was the giggle-chick on the Don and Mike Show.”

Elliker left D&M in 1998 so she could expand her role in the morning show on WHFS.  She said the WHFS show was different. It was a legendary station born out of a basement.

“I was not cool enough; I was really a dork.” Elliker said people at the station were all ‘super cool.’  “They had a HFSetival, a giant deal with 20 bands. The station took themselves so seriously. The station was on Corporate Drive, but jocks were forbidden from saying it because it wasn’t cool.” 

Elliker hosted her own morning radio show on WBAL in Baltimore from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. starting in 2007 but moved to afternoons once the station went to a news format in the afternoons and moved their veteran talk show host Ron Smith to mornings.

In addition to all this other stuff, Elliker did win the Associated Press “Best Talk Show” in both 2007 and 2008 for The Shari Elliker Show on WBAL.  

(She asked me not to bring up the awards as she’s a humble soul, but there it is.)

Her current show with John Curley on KIRO is news/talk, but it’s always an irreverent look at the world. Despite being on the same show, Curley and Elliker are a country apart during broadcasts. Curley is in Seattle, and Ellikeris in Virginia.

When Elliker was with the Don and Mike Show, Curley would come on as a regular guest, and they got to know each other. Curley was looking for a co-host. 

 Elliker went to Seattle and met with Curley. 

“We talked about all types of topics,” Elliker said. She and Curley hit it off right away. They ended up hiring TomTangney from the station, and they worked together on the Tom & Curley Show for ten years. 

Elliker left a strong impression because in 2021, the station called to say Elliker Tangey was retiring after 27 years at KIRO. After some fill-in shifts, she got the open job. That’s a good thing because Elliker seems to like her new partner. 

“John is brilliant,” she said. “He’s so present. I’ve worked with a lot of people, dealt with a lot of personalities, but John is simply the best. He has command of subjects. Discusses stories that are relevant, funny, disarming. John is never afraid to be vulnerable, even telling a childhood story every so often. They are often hilarious but heartbreaking. I really respect him.”

Living across the country might be healthy for a marriage, but how does it work for a broadcast team?

“We divide the show,” Elliker explained. “I’ll present some of the facts, John will give me his take on it, and we’ll go back and forth. It would be so boring for me if I didn’t find him completely entertaining every day. He truly makes me laugh.” 

Elliker said they had developed a rhythm, kind of like dancing. 

“We give each other room. You get to understand where the other may be going with something.”

Like I said, a healthy marriage.

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BNM Writers

Scott Masteller Has a Gift for Spotting Talent Early

According to Masteller, everybody has their style, and he doesn’t try to change their core talent. 

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Scott Masteller has seen tons of talent, format flips, and changes during his more than 40 years of experience in radio as an on-air talent, program director, and executive.

He’s currently the program director for WBAL NewsRadio in Baltimore, Maryland. Additional duties include oversight of the production of the Baltimore Ravens Football on WBAL and 98 Rock Radio. He also started the ESPN affiliate in Dallas, Texas.

“After my time at ESPN, coming to Baltimore was the perfect transition for me,” Masteller said. 

From the first moment he arrived, Masteller said people were welcoming; he was impressed with the history and legacy of the station, something he’d followed since he began in radio. 

“When I decided to come here, I knew WBAL checked a lot of boxes.”

He always wanted to be in broadcasting. 

“I started by playing a lot of bad disco records on an AM radio station, “ Masteller said. 

Now that surprised me. Not only because he liked Michael Jackson, but I wasn’t aware there were any ‘good’ disco records. 

After he left ESPN, Masteller said he had plenty of opportunities to stay in sports, but WBAL was such an iconic brand. The station is news, talk, and sports, but he said he was a little apprehensive about the news and talk part. The sports part he had down.  

“In the end, I really wanted something different. After I took the job, they told me, ‘By the way, you’re in charge of Orioles coverage. Hearst is fully committed to what we’re doing here, as they are with all their properties.”

At WBAL, the station delivers award-winning newscasts and local talk shows all day and continues focusing on the weekend.

“I’m as busy with this job as I ever had been at ESPN and other places. We’re reacting to breaking news.” 

Masteller said he started in a small town. 

“I wanted to be an on-air announcer, and I began in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I was there for 14 years doing remotes, afternoons, and music. I was also a wedding disc jockey.”

So that’s where the lousy disco comes from. 

“All of a sudden, I was doing sports,” Masteller explained. “I was a roving reporter for the Little League World Series. I got to interview Jim Palmer, and he was one of the nicest guys. I started to learn that stuff, eventually did some play-by-play.”

As in many small markets, his station ran out of money and shut down.

“It was a turning point in my career,” Masteller said.”I was excited about baseball and wanted to be an announcer. I sent tapes to every minor league team. One guy called and said he had an opening in Wichita, Kansas.”

Travel-wise that appears to be both a blessing and a bit of a curse. 

“I took the job over the phone,” Masteller explained. “I still have the letter from the GM. It was for almost no money, but it was the best experience I’d had, and it lasted for three summers.”

He broadcast for the Wichita Wranglers, the AA affiliate of the San Diego Padres, and traveled with the team on late-night bus rides and flights to Texas. 

In 2001, he was named PD at KESN, the ESPN station in Dallas. When he got to Dallas, Masteller started working behind the scenes, coaching talent, developing talent, and planning. 

“I remember I went for my first interview in Dallas. ESPN had not signed on yet. Just those four letters had that kind of branding. We went in thinking, ‘We’re going up against KTCK, The Ticket,’ one of the greatest stations of all time. A legacy station. We stuck to our plan, localized our product, generated revenue and ratings.”

Masteller put together a strong team at the startup, KESN, including Randy Galloway from the Star-Telegram and The Dallas Morning News on Galloway and Company. 

“I’ve seen what happens, ” Masteller explained. “One station will be successful, and the other station will try to emulate them and do the exact same thing.” 

He said that was a fatal mistake. The Ticket had its listeners and a culture that couldn’t be duplicated.

KVDT was branded as an ESPN station, and Masteller said they played that to the hilt. Mike and Mike were a significant franchise at the time. With the imaging, people thought the talent all lived in Texas. That’s how you merge your national shows with your local audience.

Masteller was recruited to go to Bristol as senior director of content in 2006 and stayed there until 2014. 

“I was overseeing radio and had interactions with television. It was a phenomenal place, and I learned so much. It wasn’t just ESPN; it was also Disney. By that, I mean the culture of the business, how to treat employees, and understanding what’s important. Those are experiences I’ll take with me forever.” 

Whether in sports or news, Masteller believes you must establish credibility with your talent, news anchors, or managers. He said you couldn’t do that on the first day, but the trust factor becomes hugely important. You gain that with open and honest communications.

Masteller knew of Dan Patrick in his early days at ESPN. 

“Dan is the consummate professional. I knew right away there was nobody better at conducting an interview. He knew the questions to ask. He’s got credibility. He treats people fairly but knows how to ask the tough questions. That’s what set him apart.” 

According to Masteller, everybody has their style, and he doesn’t try to change their core talent. 

“Every broadcaster is different. People used to ask themselves what their long-term legacy in the business was going to be. Today you don’t see that as much. People are always looking for that next opportunity.  One of the best things I learned from ESPN was feedback. Learn what I was doing right, what I could do better.”

A good host must know how to pivot to relate on more than just a sports level. The host must be able to react to the news of the day. 

“Sports transcends all aspects of media. It’s not just X’s and O’s anymore,” Masteller said. “You look at a big story today that has global implications. If you’re going to be a host, you’ve got to speak to different things. Things must be easy enough for an audience to digest, especially in broadcast radio. You’re always multitasking.”

Spotting talent early is a gift. Masteller said he’s instinctively known when people like Patrick came along. Then there’s Colin Cowherd. 

“Before Dallas, I was with KFXX in Portland. Colin Cowherd arrived there two weeks before I did as a midday talent. When I heard him the first time, he was a bit rough around the edges, but I knew he was going to be great. He was always thinking about the moment. Preparation for his show was second to none in terms of where he was going.” 

Masteller said Cowherd could talk about politics, social issues, family, and the stock market. Sports is what he does, but he could do a general talk show and do whatever he wanted. 

As the pandemic hit, we were looking at making a change in our morning show; we wanted to do something different. So we merged our two highest profile talents into one program with Bryan Nehman and Clarence Mitchell IV. Even though they were both working remotely, we made a move and created the C4 and Bryan Nehman Show. Sometimes it just clicks, and we all decided the best course was to get them on the air.

 “Because of the pandemic, for the first year, they never saw each other,” Masteller said. “When they finally worked face to face, I remember the first morning. I was listening and knew within 10 minutes they had chemistry. Sometimes it just clicks. All I had to do was get them in there.”

He said what makes him proud in his career is helping people get better, to achieve their goals, and to develop future leaders. 

“I remember starting a new job and wondering if I could really do it. It takes time. I’ve met some amazing people in this industry who want to learn every day. Make an impact.” 

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BNM Writers

Chris Cuomo Interview Gives NewsNation Ratings Uptick

NewsNation hopes the upward ratings momentum continues as Cuomo joins their prime time lineup later this fall.

Douglas Pucci

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In his first interview since his CNN firing, Chris Cuomo appeared on the July 26th edition of Dan Abrams Live on nascent outlet NewsNation. Cuomo’s departure from CNN stemmed from an investigation which determined how he had advised his brother, former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, amid sexual harassment allegations.

Abrams pressed Cuomo on several matters concerning CNN, as well as on what he’s been doing since he left.

Cuomo stated he’s neither a victim nor guilty of many of the things that led to his ouster. Nor did he claim to be a victim of “cancel culture”, as he commented, “I don’t think I’ve ever been a victim of anything ever in my life…I don’t feel sorry for myself.”

Dan Abrams Live featuring Chris Cuomo drew 187,000 total viewers, according to Nielsen Media Research. While that pales in comparison to what the three major cable news networks deliver throughout the day, the figure marked a giant boost from the program’s normal levels — it more than tripled it; for July 18-22, the original 9 p.m. telecast of Abrams averaged 56,000 viewers per weeknight.

Time-slot wise, Abrams was able to best Newsmax’s competing Prime News (115,000 viewers). But on that evening, Newsmax’s Eric Bolling: The Balance (188,000) and Greg Kelly Reports (194,000) still managed to top all NewsNation fare.

NewsNation hopes the upward ratings momentum continues as Cuomo joins their prime time lineup later this fall. His former nightly show Cuomo Prime Time — although rated behind FNC’s Hannity and MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show in the 9 p.m. slot — had been CNN’s No. 1 program during its brief run.

Cable news averages for July 25-31, 2022:

Total Day (July 25-31 @ 6 a.m.-5:59 a.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 1.378 million viewers; 182,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 0.688 million viewers; 71,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.485 million viewers; 95,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.190 million viewers; 55,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.147 million viewers; 38,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.122 million viewers; 10,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.110 million viewers; 13,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.106 million viewers; 22,000 adults 25-54

Prime Time (July 25-30 @ 8-11 p.m.; July 31 @ 7-11 p.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 2.139 million viewers; 277,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 1.138 million viewers; 101,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.620 million viewers; 129,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.227 million viewers; 68,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.205 million viewers; 55,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.138 million viewers; 24,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.137 million viewers; 14,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 0.057 million viewers; 6,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.055 million viewers; 6,000 adults 25-54

Top 10 most-watched cable news programs (and the top programs of other outlets with their respective associated ranks) in total viewers:

1. The Five (FOXNC, Mon. 7/25/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.482 million viewers

2. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Mon. 7/25/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.286 million viewers

3. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.281 million viewers

4. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 7/26/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.204 million viewers

5. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 7/28/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.128 million viewers

6. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 7/28/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.090 million viewers

7. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.028 million viewers

8. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 7/29/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.951 million viewers

9. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 7/26/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.855 million viewers

10. Hannity (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.706 million viewers

20. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Mon. 7/25/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.354 million viewers

171. Anderson Cooper 360 (CNN, Mon. 7/25/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.780 million viewers

220. Real Time With Bill Maher “Episode 606” (HBO, Fri. 7/29/2022 10:01 PM, 59 min.) 0.656 million viewers

337. Last Week Tonight (HBO, Sun. 7/31/2022 11:00 PM, 34 min.) 0.458 million viewers

344. The Daily Show (CMDY, Tue. 7/26/2022 11:00 PM, 31 min.) 0.448 million viewers

351. Forensic Files II “Unraveled” (HLN, Sun. 7/31/2022 10:30 PM, 30 min.) 0.432 million viewers

376. Varney & Company (FBN, Fri. 7/29/2022 11:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.386 million viewers

408. Full Frontal with Samantha Bee “Episode 7215” (TBS, Thu. 7/28/2022 10:00 PM, 30 min.) 0.346 million viewers

442. Shark Tank “Shark Tank 805” (CNBC, Sun. 7/31/2022 11:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.311 million viewers

694. Deep Water Salvage “(209) Salvage 911” (TWC, Sun. 7/31/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.191 million viewers

705. Dan Abrams Live “Chris Cuomo Interview 7/26/22” (NWSN, Tue. 7/26/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.187 million viewers

Top 10 cable news programs (and the top  programs of other outlets with their respective associated ranks) among adults 25-54

1. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Mon. 7/25/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.501 million adults 25-54

2. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.494 million adults 25-54

3. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.415 million adults 25-54

4. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 7/28/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.413 million adults 25-54

5. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 7/26/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.403 million adults 25-54

6. The Five (FOXNC, Mon. 7/25/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.397 million adults 25-54

7. Jesse Watters Primetime (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.385 million adults 25-54

8. Hannity (FOXNC, Wed. 7/27/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.383 million adults 25-54

9. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 7/28/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.380 million adults 25-54

10. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 7/29/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.366 million adults 25-54

52. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Mon. 7/25/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.212 million adults 25-54

67. Forensic Files “Trail Of A Killer” (HLN, Thu. 7/28/2022 12:00 AM, 30 min.) 0.182 million adults 25-54

82. The Daily Show (CMDY, Tue. 7/26/2022 11:00 PM, 31 min.) 0.171 million adults 25-54

90. Don Lemon Tonight (CNN, Wed. 7/27/2022 10:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.165 million adults 25-54

114. Full Frontal with Samantha Bee “Episode 7215” (TBS, Thu. 7/28/2022 10:00 PM, 30 min.) 0.148 million adults 25-54

156. Last Week Tonight (HBO, Sun. 7/31/2022 11:00 PM, 34 min.) 0.134 million adults 25-54

166. Shark Tank “Shark Tank 614” (CNBC, Sun. 7/31/2022 12:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.128 million adults 25-54

318. Real Time With Bill Maher “Episode 606” (HBO, Fri. 7/29/2022 10:01 PM, 59 min.) 0.093 million adults 25-54

496. America’s Morning Headquarters (TWC, Fri. 7/29/2022 9:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.064 million adults 25-54

733. Newsnation: Rush Hour (NWSN, Thu. 7/28/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.038 million adults 25-54

745. Kudlow (FBN, Wed. 7/27/2022 4:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.037 million adults 25-54

Source: Live+Same Day data, Nielsen Media Research

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