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Chicago Public Media Merger with the Sun-Times Now Complete

Chicago Public Media did not disclose the price for the Sun-Times. 

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A couple of weeks ago, the Chicago Public Media board approved the merger with the Chicago Sun-Times, now the union between the two is complete. 

Under terms of the deal, the newspaper now becomes a subsidiary of the radio station. In a statement shared by Inside Radio, Chicago Public Media did not disclose the price for the Sun-Times. 

Nonetheless, the radio station states that it received pledges of $61 million from nearly a dozen philanthropies and donors who “share a belief in journalism’s critical role in informing the public, strengthening local communities, and safeguarding democracy.”

“We are excited about what lies ahead for this unique model of nonprofit news and raising the bar for supporting, preserving, and strengthening local journalism,” Chicago Sun-Times CEO Nykia Wright said. 

According to the Chicago Public Media, the merger will create one of the nation’s largest local nonprofit news organizations. Furthermore, the radio station and newspaper will reach more than two million people a week in the Chicago area across broadcast, print, and digital channels.

When it comes to the funding, Chicago Public Media says it’s “mostly pledged over a five-year period,” which is directed towards keeping and building the Sun-Times’ print and digital products. Also, the company will use it to cover the finances needed to support collaboration between the two newsrooms. 

“The response from the philanthropic community has been tremendous,” Chicago Public Media CEO Matt Moog stated. 

“With their support, our talented team will tell the stories that matter and serve more people than ever before with human-centered, solutions-oriented journalism. We aim to connect Chicagoans more deeply to each other, to their communities, and to the issues and solutions that shape their lives.”  

News Print & Digital

New Texas Law Will Make It Illegal to Block, Ban Posts on Social Media Outlets

Texas lawmakers ruled last week that makes it illegal to block, ban, remove, deplatform, demonetize, and de-boost posts on social media platforms.

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Texas lawmakers have put Big Tech on notice following a ruling last week that makes it illegal to block, ban, remove, deplatform, demonetize, and de-boost posts on social media platforms with 50 million or more US monthly users.

The 15-word ruling will most likely set the stage for an intense debate in the Supreme Court and could further divide a nation struggling to interpret free speech and the First Amendment.

According to MSN, Texas’s law, HB 20, which seeks to address the perceived imbalance, was blocked in December by a district court judge who ruled it was unconstitutional under the First Amendment.

Trade organizations NetChoice and the Computer Communications Industry Association have appealed directly to the Supreme Court, according to The Verge. In a statement, NetChoice counsel Chris Marchese said the law strips private online businesses of their speech rights.

“The First Amendment prohibits Texas from forcing online platforms to host and promote foreign propaganda, pornography, pro-Nazi speech, and spam,” he added.

The Texas attorney general’s that the appeals court made the right decision and said it would continue defending the Texas law.

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Ted Sarandos to Staffers: Quit Netflix if You Find It Hard to Support Our Content

The Netflix CEO sent an internal memo discussing the diversity of its products and suggested that some content may conflict with people’s personal beliefs. 

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As streaming giant Netflix continues to hemorrhage subscribers, the company has reportedly told its employees to find a new job if they’re offended by some of the content that is being created.  

According to Variety, CEO Ted Sarandos sent an internal memo discussing the diversity of its products and suggested that some content may conflict with people’s personal beliefs. 

“Depending on your role, you may need to work on titles you perceive to be harmful,” the memo said. “If you’d find it hard to support our content breadth, Netflix may not be the best place for you.”

According to the company’s first-quarter earnings report, Netflix lost 200,000 subscribers during the January-March period. Some employees staged a walkout when Dave Chapelle railed against transgenderism. At that time, the company vowed not to silence its artists. 

Sarandos reiterated that Netflix supports individualism and respects the principles and values of its subscribers. 

“While every title is different, we approach them based on the same set of principles: We support the artistic expression of the creators we choose to work with; we program for a diversity of audiences and tastes; and we let viewers decide what’s appropriate for them, versus having Netflix censor specific artists or voices,” the memo added.

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Elon Musk Committed to Buying Twitter Despite Deal Being on Hold

The Telsa CEO linked a Reuters report, stating that false or spam accounts depict fewer than 5-percent of its monetizable daily engaged users during the first quarter.

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Elon Musk’s endeavor to purchase Twitter is temporarily on pause due to the pending investigation into the number of bots that comprise the social media outlet’s userbase.

The Telsa CEO linked a Reuters report, stating that false or spam accounts depict fewer than 5-percent of its monetizable daily engaged users during the first quarter.

“Twitter deal temporarily on hold pending details supporting calculation that spam/fake accounts do indeed represent less than 5% of users,” Musk tweeted on Friday. 

Musk then added that he’s “still committed to acquisition” of the social media giant. Twitter had 229 million users who were served advertising in the first quarter.

The disclosure came days after Musk, who has agreed to a deal to buy Twitter for $44 billion, tweeted that one of his priorities would be to rid “spam bots” from the platform.

Also, Twitter shares declined 11-percent pre-market trading after Musk tweeted the Reuters article; however, shares for Tesla increased as much as 4.9-percent. 

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