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Michael Irvin’s Suits Have Elevated Him To The Next Level As A Broadcaster

“My suits are like my cape. They turn me into Superman. Without them, I really feel like Clark Kent.”

Derek Futterman

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As the Los Angeles Rams hoisted the historic Vince Lombardi Trophy on their home field at SoFi Stadium after their thrilling comeback in Super Bowl LVI, the conclusion of another football season had arrived.

A thrilling month-long stretch of close games, dating back to the Week 18 Sunday Night Football thriller in Las Vegas between the Raiders and Chargers with a playoff berth on the line, had perhaps launched the greatest stretch of big games the National Football League has ever seen in its 101 years of existence.

Whether it was three consecutive divisional round games ending on a field goal, the back-and-forth battle of AFC quarterbacks Patrick Mahomes and Josh Allen decided in overtime, the late-game heroics of both the Bengals and Rams to secure conference championships, or what we just witnessed Sunday, these playoffs generated immense levels of excitement and engagement across multiple platforms of dissemination, leading to record ratings and revenue.

At the same time, the NFL had storylines surrounding the action both on and off the field, and there undoubtedly remains plenty to talk about over the coming months as the delay of baseball becomes more imminent. The retirement of Tom Brady has amplified debates regarding who the greatest athlete of all-time may be. Brian Flores’ lawsuit against the league alleging discrimination in hiring practices seeks to foster significant change to a system NFL commissioner Roger Goodell acknowledged as not doing enough in trying to promote diversity.

There’s also the injury to Odell Beckham, Jr., the nostalgic Pepsi Super Bowl Halftime Show, and uncertain future of Green Bay Packers quarterback and NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers to talk about as well, just to name a few of the other storylines.

One of the people who will keep the football conversation alive is NFL Hall of Fame wide receiver and commentator for NFL Network and ESPN, Michael Irvin. Known for his flamboyance and passion for football, Irvin delivers his analysis and opinions about the game periodically, appearing alongside Stephen A. Smith on Mondays as a co-host on First Take, a show which has consistently improved its ratings since its reformatting in September.

Whenever he appears on camera, fans can look forward to seeing Irvin’s wardrobe for the day. On Tuesday’s Damon and Ratto on 95.7 The Game, Irvin said his suit gives him special powers.

“I didn’t have my suit on First Take last week because the box didn’t come,” explained Irvin. “My suits are like my cape. They turn me into Superman. Without them, I really feel like Clark Kent.”

Irvin’s father, Walter, was a roofer, and worked from sunrise to sundown every day. Growing up around him inspired Michael to work hard and make a good life for himself. After his father’s death, he used the clothes he wore when he helped his father as motivation to perform at the highest level on the field.

“I took the clothes [I wore] when I worked with him, sat them on the wall in college and said to myself: ‘Brother, if you don’t make it in this, you’re going back to that,’” Irvin reminisced. “Every time I saw a [defensive back] lined up, all I saw was [my father working] on that damn roof. I said: ‘Brother, I’m about to hurt you if you don’t get out the way. I’m not going to do that all my life.’”

Throughout his post-retirement job as a football analyst and commentator, Irvin strives to remain grateful for the opportunities he has been given and has worked hard to earn. Despite many long days, including the 8.5-hour NFL GameDay broadcast leading up to Super Bowl LVI, Irvin knows that if he told his father about his current occupation, his father would not be able to find any complaints.

“It’s the greatest job in the world,” said Irvin. “I just witnessed the greatest season, at least in the playoffs, in the world, right here as we came out of a pandemic. Sometimes it gets tough. Sometimes it gets hard. But man, it’s the greatest gig in the world.”

“They pay us to do it – it’s unbelievable,” added KNBR co-host Damon Bruce. “Michael, you’re the only man who sounds like he’s better dressed than everyone on the radio.”

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Sports Radio News

Dan Dakich: Craig Carton is ‘The Way Talk Radio Should Be’

“If you’re being critical because you want to be the guy that’s always critical I don’t think you can do that either. I think you gotta be honest. And criticism comes with it.”

Jordan Bondurant

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Craig Carton has prided himself on being one of those hosts who tells it like it is, especially when talking about New York’s pro sports teams.

That willingness to call a spade a spade and levy criticism on teams like the Jets and Giants, especially when things are not going well on the field, is something Dan Dakich has always seen as a recipe for success in the industry.

Interviewing Carton on Thursday on his Outkick show Don’t @ Me, Dakich praised the WFAN afternoon host for essentially creating a blueprint for how sports talk should be done.

“In Indianapolis I’m the bad guy right, because I say look the Colts stink, this regime is 46-49-1 – why are you telling me the GM is the best in the country – why are you telling me Frank Reich can really coach?” Dakich said. “New York’s different, though, right? I mean, New York they expect you to say look if you ain’t any good then you ain’t any good. Yu don’t sugarcoat nothing, and I think that’s the way talk radio should be.”

Carton noted that what’s key in how you critique a team or a front office, executive or owner is finding a balance. He said you can’t as a host be the ultimate homer and blow smoke up everyone’s behind.

“You have to be able to be critical when it’s warranted,” Carton said. “If you’re being critical because you want to be the guy that’s always critical I don’t think you can do that either. I think you gotta be honest. And criticism comes with it.”

Carton pointed out that the fan bases in both New York and in Indianapolis are ultimately the same, because at the end of the day it’s all about making sure you have competent people calling the right shots. He added that the organizations are the same too because of how sensitive they can be to criticism, which he said if they don’t like it, “too bad.”

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Nick Ashooh Joins BetMGM Tonight

Jordan Bondurant

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The talent lineup for the BetQL show BetMGM Tonight is expanding, and Nick Ashooh is joining the team.

The news became official on Thursday when BetQL announced the addition of Ashooh on Twitter.

Ashooh has worked mainly in the D.C. market up to this point in his career, hosting for Audacy and NBC Sports Washington. He had been contributing sports betting content for the BetQL network for the latter part of the last year.

Ashooh joins co-hosts Trysta Krick and Ryan Horvat on BetMGM Tonight. The show can be heard weeknights from 7-11 p.m.

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Sports Radio News

1010XL Jay Fund Radiothon Raises Nearly $250,000 For Pediatric Cancer Research

“In the 15 year history of the radiothon, the station has raised just under $1.5 billion for the Jay Fund.”

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Jacksonville’s 1010XL used its airwaves to raise money for the Jay Fund for the fifteenth year earlier this week. The radiothon was a smashing success, raising $249,784 to fight pediatric cancer.

This year’s total is a new record for the event. In the 15 year history of the radiothon, the station has raised just under $1.6 million for the Jay Fund.

“I’m truly amazed at the generosity of the 1010 XL listeners in times when a carton of eggs cost six dollars,” said General Manager Steven Griffin, “and equally amazed how the hosts, producers, radio staff and volunteers come together with a singular focus to year-after-year produce these results in one broadcast day.”

Former Jacksonville Jaguars and New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin started the Jay Fund in memory of  Jay McGillis, who developed leukemia while playing for Coughlin at Boston College. The organization has helped over 5,000 families and given away over $16 million in grants in Northeast Florida and the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan Area.

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