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Noah Eagle on Getting Clippers Radio Job Out of College: ‘The Stars Can Align’

“People always ask me when I decided I wanted to get into it? I think it was pretty simple in the sense that I had a good relationship with my dad and I saw he enjoyed what he did.”

Ricky Keeler

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You never know when a major opportunity in the sports industry will come knocking at your door. For Noah Eagle, he would never imagine that as a senior at Syracuse, working as the television voice for the Los Angeles Clippers could potentially be an option.

Eagle was a guest on the You Know I’m Right podcast with Nick Durst and Joe Calabrese to talk about his career. He mentioned that the Clippers job was great timing for him, but when the leader of the Sports Media Center at Syracuse asked him to send his basketball reel, he had no idea what it was for.

“It was really awesome timing… The timing, if it’s right, the stars can align,” Eagle said. “I got really lucky. I got really fortunate in particular with the timing of the Clippers job. I was a senior at Syracuse, the longtime voice of the Clippers, Ralph Lawler, it was his 40th and final year with the team. He was retiring at the end of the year.

“I didn’t know this. I wasn’t aware of any of it, but I did get a call from a professor I had. She was the leader of the Sports Media Center at Syracuse at Newhouse, Olivia Stomski. She reached out to me and said ‘Send me your basketball reel, somebody is interested.'”

“I said, can you be more specific? She said, no I can’t. I said, why not? She said, trust me,” Eagle continued. “I put together a basketball reel of all the stuff I had to that point (January-early February 2019). I had decided my senior year, I’m not going to focus too hard on the job stuff until March. I wanted to enjoy my senior year, then I was going to go full-steam ahead with it. That was kind of my mentality going into the year.”

After sending his resume and bio a week later and still not knowing what position he was sending these things for, Eagle was driving to the studio where he hosted a radio show in downtown Syracuse and he got a call from a Los Angeles number. He ended up taking a chance and picked up the call: 

“I answer it and it’s this big, booming voice,” Eagle recalled. “‘This is Nick Davis from FOX Sports West and Prime Ticket. I’m sure you are aware we are looking to replace Ralph Lawler with the Clippers and your name came up. So, we’d like to fly you out and interview you and audition you next week.’ I thought someone was going to pop out from my back seat and slap me across the face. I said, `’Are you sure you got the right guy?'”

After auditioning and having a memorable interview with owner Steve Ballmer, Eagle ended up getting the radio play-by-play job when Brian Sieman moved to television.

Of course, everyone knows Noah Eagle’s dad, Ian. Noah watched his dad in the booth from a very young age and one of the reasons that helped him decide he wanted to be in the same profession was the excitement Ian had for the job he was doing:

“He took me to work with him from a pretty early age,” Eagle explained. “In terms of physically being in the booth, I was probably 3-4 years old. I took a liking to it very early. There was never something that he said, ‘Oh man, I really am praying that my son loves sports.’ It just happened naturally.

“People always ask me when I decided I wanted to get into it? I think it was pretty simple in the sense that I had a good relationship with my dad and I saw he enjoyed what he did… He enjoys it, he gets up, he gets excited for it.

“Sure, could he get stressed out if he had five games in six days in five different cities? Without a doubt. Anybody would. But when he was there, when he came home in the morning, he was excited and he was smiling talking about it. All of those factors certainly helped in my decision-making and it swayed me in that direction. 

“I think once you get to the point where you are perceptive enough and you know enough, you see a TV and understand what’s happening. I would see a TV and go, ‘There’s Dad.’ At the same time, I looked at it as it’s just him going to work. That was the mentality I grew up with. He gets excited for his job. That’s what really stood out to me.” 

During this podcast, Eagle will also explain how he ended up working the 2021 Tokyo Olympics for NBC and why he was so excited to get the play-by-play job for the NFL Wild Card playoff games broadcast on Nickelodeon. 

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Sports Radio News

Dan Dakich: Craig Carton is ‘The Way Talk Radio Should Be’

“If you’re being critical because you want to be the guy that’s always critical I don’t think you can do that either. I think you gotta be honest. And criticism comes with it.”

Jordan Bondurant

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Craig Carton has prided himself on being one of those hosts who tells it like it is, especially when talking about New York’s pro sports teams.

That willingness to call a spade a spade and levy criticism on teams like the Jets and Giants, especially when things are not going well on the field, is something Dan Dakich has always seen as a recipe for success in the industry.

Interviewing Carton on Thursday on his Outkick show Don’t @ Me, Dakich praised the WFAN afternoon host for essentially creating a blueprint for how sports talk should be done.

“In Indianapolis I’m the bad guy right, because I say look the Colts stink, this regime is 46-49-1 – why are you telling me the GM is the best in the country – why are you telling me Frank Reich can really coach?” Dakich said. “New York’s different, though, right? I mean, New York they expect you to say look if you ain’t any good then you ain’t any good. Yu don’t sugarcoat nothing, and I think that’s the way talk radio should be.”

Carton noted that what’s key in how you critique a team or a front office, executive or owner is finding a balance. He said you can’t as a host be the ultimate homer and blow smoke up everyone’s behind.

“You have to be able to be critical when it’s warranted,” Carton said. “If you’re being critical because you want to be the guy that’s always critical I don’t think you can do that either. I think you gotta be honest. And criticism comes with it.”

Carton pointed out that the fan bases in both New York and in Indianapolis are ultimately the same, because at the end of the day it’s all about making sure you have competent people calling the right shots. He added that the organizations are the same too because of how sensitive they can be to criticism, which he said if they don’t like it, “too bad.”

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Nick Ashooh Joins BetMGM Tonight

Jordan Bondurant

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The talent lineup for the BetQL show BetMGM Tonight is expanding, and Nick Ashooh is joining the team.

The news became official on Thursday when BetQL announced the addition of Ashooh on Twitter.

Ashooh has worked mainly in the D.C. market up to this point in his career, hosting for Audacy and NBC Sports Washington. He had been contributing sports betting content for the BetQL network for the latter part of the last year.

Ashooh joins co-hosts Trysta Krick and Ryan Horvat on BetMGM Tonight. The show can be heard weeknights from 7-11 p.m.

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Sports Radio News

1010XL Jay Fund Radiothon Raises Nearly $250,000 For Pediatric Cancer Research

“In the 15 year history of the radiothon, the station has raised just under $1.5 billion for the Jay Fund.”

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Jacksonville’s 1010XL used its airwaves to raise money for the Jay Fund for the fifteenth year earlier this week. The radiothon was a smashing success, raising $249,784 to fight pediatric cancer.

This year’s total is a new record for the event. In the 15 year history of the radiothon, the station has raised just under $1.6 million for the Jay Fund.

“I’m truly amazed at the generosity of the 1010 XL listeners in times when a carton of eggs cost six dollars,” said General Manager Steven Griffin, “and equally amazed how the hosts, producers, radio staff and volunteers come together with a singular focus to year-after-year produce these results in one broadcast day.”

Former Jacksonville Jaguars and New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin started the Jay Fund in memory of  Jay McGillis, who developed leukemia while playing for Coughlin at Boston College. The organization has helped over 5,000 families and given away over $16 million in grants in Northeast Florida and the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan Area.

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