Connect with us
BSM Summit
blank

BSM Writers

Back To Basics: Distractions

” If you know you only have 10 minutes before you are supposed to hit that next break and you love the topic that you teased in the previous segment, then you do not have time to be distracted.”

Avatar photo

Published

on

blank

Picture this moment, you’re about to crack the microphone and return from commercial break when all of the sudden someone passes by the studio door holding a birthday cake. Now, the mic turns on, and instead of diving into whatever you had planned, you’re discussing the birthday cake that’s made its way down the halls. This lasts about 3 to 5 minutes before you’re able to get back on track to what you were initially planning to discuss.

Every host has done this, some more than others, but you’d be lying to yourself if you read that brief, made-up anecdote and said – “that’s never me!” 

Of course, you can replace the birthday cake in this story with just about anything. In fact, I’ve often referred to this type of on-air occurrence as the ‘fly in the studio’. aAn easily distracted host will discuss the smallest movement or change to their surroundings, even if the entertainment value is sub-par at best.

This was something that ailed me a lot in my early on-air years, just getting used to being the host and having full power over the content that was delivered. It would send me down many useless rabbit holes that didn’t really need to be explored. I’ve noticed this is the case when listening in to a lot of inexperienced or “green” hosts. A fly in the studio tends to send them down roads that they probably think are entertaining. In reality, they’re just a waste of the listeners’ time. 

Now, don’t get me wrong, there are times when this type of spontaneous discussion can work out brilliantly. When done well and with the right subject, letting people into the absurdity around you has upside, but more times than not those discussions entertain the hosts more than the audience at large. I think it comes down to frequency, selectiveness, and knowing yourself as a host. If you overdo the ‘randomness’ bit, it won’t be random anymore. If you choose to discuss every malfunction or spilled cup of coffee, your audience will expect you to be derailed on the regular, which has to have negative long-term effects on your show.

Finally, you’ve got to know if you’re good at letting people in when something strange occurs around you. Are you a good spontaneous storyteller? Are you funny? These are categories where we tend to overrate ourselves, especially as radio hosts. I think the best hosts learn that just because you have a thought, that doesn’t mean everyone needs to hear it. 

Look, it’s 2022. We all have some form of attention deficit disorder. Some may be clinical and some may be environmental, but either way, it’s easier than ever to get derailed as a radio host. Your phone is going off throughout the show, your co-host is checking their Apple Watch mid-segment, and your boss expects that email to be replied to within minutes. We all deal with this on a regular basis, that’s why it’s more important than ever to cut out the distraction and focus on what brought you to the dance. Believe it or not, no one tunes in to sports talk radio to hear a host go on and on about their recent text message or a producer’s choice in rejoin music. 

The simple solution is this: Know yourself as a host, believe in your content, and don’t skimp on preparation. If you know you only have 10 minutes before you are supposed to hit that next break and you love the topic that you teased in the previous segment, then you do not have time to be distracted. If you’ve put a good amount of prep into the segment, your audience is more likely to gobble up that discussion than any silliness you may be tempted to waste their time with.

I can not reiterate this enough, our jobs are not to entertain ourselves. Our jobs are to entertain a listening audience. Don’t do them the disservice of wasting too much of their time. 

Barrett Blogs

BSM’s Black Friday SALE on BSM Summit Tickets is Underway!

Jason Barrett

Published

on

blank

Each year I’m asked if there are ways to save money on tickets to the 2023 BSM Summit. I always answer yes but not everyone takes advantage of it. For those interested in doing so, here’s your shot.

For TODAY ONLY, individual tickets to the 2023 BSM Summit are reduced by $50.00. Two ticket and four ticket packages are also lowered at $50 per ticket. To secure your seat at a discounted price, just log on to BSMSummit.com. This sale ends tonight at 11:59pm ET.

If you’re flying to Los Angeles for the event, be sure to reserve your hotel room. Our hotel partner this year is the USC Hotel. It’s walking distance of our venue. Full details on hotel rooms can also be found via the conference website.

Continue Reading

BSM Writers

Media Noise: What Does The Return of Bob Iger Mean to ESPN?

Demetri Ravanos

Published

on

blank

Demetri Ravanos has questions about Disney going back to the future with Bob Iger. This entire episode of Media Noise is all about what the change at the top of the Walt Disney Company indicates about the future of ESPN.

ITunes: https://buff.ly/3PjJWpO

Spotify: https://buff.ly/3AVwa90

iHeart: https://buff.ly/3cbINCp

Google: https://buff.ly/3PbgHWx

Amazon: https://buff.ly/3cbIOpX

Continue Reading

BSM Writers

Media Noise: What Is Realistic For FOX at the World Cup?

Demetri Ravanos

Published

on

blank

On this special holiday edition of Media Noise, Demetri Ravanos dives into the controversy and criticism surrounding FOX’s coverage of the World Cup in Qatar.

ITunes: https://buff.ly/3PjJWpO

Spotify: https://buff.ly/3AVwa90

iHeart: https://buff.ly/3cbINCp

Google: https://buff.ly/3PbgHWx

Amazon: https://buff.ly/3cbIOpX

Continue Reading
Advertisement blank
Advertisement blank

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2022 Barrett Media.