Connect with us
Jim Cutler Demos

BSM Writers

Remote Broadcasts Affect Announcers and Sports Fans

“Broadcasters want to be at the games and the fans want the broadcasters to be at the games.”

Avatar photo

Published

on

Dallas Morning News

What makes a good play-by-play announcer, especially on radio, is the ability to paint a picture and to make the audience feel like they’re part of the game. Of course, the best way to do that is for the announcer to feel like he or she is part of the game, because the objective is to transfer the emotion and the feel of the game to the fans who are listening on the radio and watching on television.

But we currently live in a world where sometimes the play-by-play announcer has to paint that picture and call a game without actually being at the game.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many broadcasters have had to pivot and call games remotely from a studio watching on a monitor. Play-by-play announcers, for the most part, were able to call home games in person, but going on the road wasn’t permitted for quite a while and there’s no doubt that it has an effect on a broadcast when calling a game remotely. 

“The biggest challenge is that I can’t watch the entire rink like I normally do,” said longtime New York Islanders radio voice Chris King. “I’m forced to watch whatever the director decides is the most important thing to watch which usually is the puck carrier or the area around the puck and nothing away from the puck whatsoever. You only have one view and you need to see a lot more than what the director is showing you.”

When the National Hockey League returned to play in a bubble for the 2020 playoffs, King did not travel with the team to Canada so he had to call games remotely from a studio with the NHL providing a video feed and the natural sound from the arena to make the broadcasts sound as if he was actually at the game. There are a number of things a play-by-play announcer can miss out on when he or she is not at the game.

Let’s be honest…you’re at the mercy of the director of the telecast.

“It’s a one goal game and the Islanders are down late,” said King. “You know at some point that they are going to pull their goaltender. The problem is that when you’re watching on a video screen, they’re only showing the attacking zone for the Islanders. They’re not showing when the Islander goaltender is racing off the ice.”  

King couldn’t look down to the other end of the ice to see if the goalie was leaving for the team to bring on an extra attacker. He had no choice but to start counting the players in the offensive zone to figure out if the goalie had skated over to the bench.

“If I counted five Islanders, I would guess that the goalie is still in,” said King. “If I counted six Islanders, I would guess that the goalie is on the bench.”

It’s not easy to call a game remotely and I’ve learned that firsthand this year as the play-by-play voice of the National Lacrosse League’s New York Riptide. I’ve been a play-by-play announcer for all sorts of high school, college and professional sports over the years but I had never called a game remotely at any level until this past December. 

I knew at a young age that I wanted to be a play-by-play announcer and I can’t tell you how many times that I sat in front of a television with a tape recorder “announcing” a game.

I never thought I would do something similar to that professionally, but there I was this past December 10th calling the New York Riptide game in Philadelphia on a monitor in a studio at the radio station. One of my worst fears became reality when I was calling the game and while the ball was in play, the director cut to shot of a coach on the bench.

What do I do?

At first, I thought I would just make up calling the play-by-play for a couple of seconds but I instead chose to be honest and say that the feed cut to a shot of the bench. There was also another time this season when doing a road game when we lost the feed of the game for a few minutes and our broadcast changed from calling a game to doing a talk show for a few minutes. 

While the pandemic has subsided to the point where fans have returned to the arenas and stadiums and the announcers, in many cases, have begun to return to the road games, calling a game remotely isn’t something that you can completely blame on the pandemic.

In fact, there are teams, leagues and networks that have been having broadcasters work remotely for years. 

“I have called numerous games over the years remotely,” said veteran play-by-play announcer Dave Leno who is the voice of Major League Soccer’s Philadelphia Union and has also called play-by-play from a studio for the Big Ten Network, U.S. Open Tennis and Japanese baseball games. 

“The biggest obstacle when calling games from the studio is we can only call what we see,” said Leno. “When we’re on-site, we can add more color to the broadcast- whether it be identifying a a player off-screen, describing the atmosphere and the crowd is impacting the game, spotting potential subs getting ready to enter and dissecting playing conditions.”

While announcers have called soccer matches and other various sports remotely over the years before the pandemic, hard-core sports fans have certainly noticed a difference through the pandemic in watching or listening to a game and quite frankly it’s been an adjustment for a lot of broadcasters who may never have had to do this. Whether you’re a local announcer, a play-by-play voice of a prominent sports franchise or even a network broadcaster, it’s much harder to paint a picture and tell the story when you’re not at the game and you don’t have direct access to players, managers, coaches and staff.

“I’ll always be in favor of calling the game in person vs the studio,” said Leno. “Taking that walk from the car up to the stadium then to the press box and into your broadcast booth just hits differently than walking into a studio and starting at monitors for a few hours.”

In many ways, sports fans have certainly been dealt an inferior product when watching or listening to a game with remote broadcasters. It’s not a knock on the announcers because, as I can attest to, it is much more difficult when you’re not at the game. You can’t go down to the locker room or even the field, court or ice and talk to players and coaches, get some inside info or simply find out about injuries and lineups.

“I want to be able to call the game as accurately as possible,” said King. “That is so important to me and I can’t do that off of a TV screen.”

And if the announcers can’t see something or get a feel of the game, it doesn’t just affect their job…it also makes it more difficult for the fan to follow along.

“Calling the game from a studio or at home, just doesn’t give that same ‘big-tim’ production feel,” said Leno. “The broadcaster and crew have to sacrifice a bit, and in turn so does the fan.”

Broadcasters want to be at the games and the fans want the broadcasters to be at the games. You can’t do as good a job as being at the game whether its for public health reasons or for budgetary concerns. 

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

BSM Writers

104.5 The Zone Keeps Rising Under Paul Mason as Nashville Continues to Grow

“It starts with the people that you have on your staff but it starts above that.  It’s having great people that trust you to build your vision.” 

Avatar photo

Published

on

Nashville background with the 104.5 The Zone logo and a picture of Paul Mason
Nashville Skyline Courtesy of: SeanPavonePhoto/Fotolia

When Paul Mason arrived at 104.5 FM “The Zone” in Nashville to take over as Program Director in April of 2020, he was hoping to made an immediate impact at the radio station. The growth was helped by a Tennessee Titans run to the AFC Championship Game during the COVID year of 2020 and four years later, the station is doing very well.

“I could not be happier with what we’ve seen here at The Zone with just the growth of this group as a whole,” said Mason who took on the added title of Operations Manager of Titans Radio in April 2021. 

“It’s come together as a team and everybody roots for everybody and pulls for everybody to win. I think you’re seeing all tides rise because as a PD I cannot be anymore pleased with what I’ve seen unfold the last several years.”

There’s no question that the Nashville sports market is booming and that’s just a part of the rapid growth that the city has experienced in recent years. Major pro sports arrived in town when the Houston Oilers relocated to Nashville in 1997 and two seasons later they were renamed the Titans. In 1998, the Nashville Predators joined the National Hockey League as an expansion team and went to the Stanley Cup Final in 2017. And now, there’s a Major League Soccer club in town after Nashville SC was born in 2020.

Throw in the fact that it’s always been a huge SEC market and the sports scene is exploding in Nashville.

“It’s growing and it’s growing very quickly,” said Mason. “There are new people moving here every day and getting exposed to not only different teams but also to us. It’s important to us and we’re always marketing what this brand is and who we are to not just the people who have been here and have been loyal to us over the years but the new people coming in.”

Building a radio station and the brand that comes along with it is not an easy thing to do. A lot has to go your way and now there are digital considerations that play into a radio station’s revenue stream.

In the case of The Zone, business has been good for the brand.

“If the brand is right, everything else is going to follow so if we’re talking about or targeting the things on air that our audience comes to us with an expectation, that’s going to grow,” said Mason. “We are delivering on those expectations. We’re obviously very football-centric and very Titan-centric but the key is balancing that with everything else in the town as well.”

There’s no question that the sports radio industry has changed over the years and continues to evolve, especially when it comes to technology. These days, it’s not just about the terrestrial aspect of a radio station but other ways that content is distributed whether it’s video, podcast or streaming. Those other components are extremely important to a radio station’s success.

It’s something that Mason and his team have taken to very well.

“You have to embrace technology and you have to embrace things evolving and if you resist, you’re going to get left behind,” said Mason. “What we’ve done well here is we’re on every social media platform and we do it well. We’ve embraced video by creating Zone TV a few years back. In the world that we live in now, you need to be in all the places that your audience wants to consume you.”

While Mason has been very successful in the role of Program Director, it does take a village for a sports radio station to be successful. At The Zone, Mason has been getting a lot of help from his friends. Whether it’s Cumulus Nashville Market Manager Allison Warren or Operations Manager Charlie Cook, Mason has and continues to receive a great deal of support from up above.

“It’s all about the people,” said Mason. “It starts with the people that you have on your staff but it starts above that. It’s having great people that trust you to build your vision.” 

And the vision has led to a terrific lineup at The Zone including Ramon, Kayla and Will from 6am to 10am, Buck Reising 10am to 1pm, Blaine and Mickey from 1pm to 3pm and 3HL from 3pm to 7pm.

“Just beyond our air staff, it’s having a good sales staff, a good promotions staff and good producers,” said Mason. “My job is to be the resource for them to put them in the best position possible to do what they do best.”

Speaking of those shows, the lineup at The Zone did very well in the 2023 Barrett Sports Media Top 20 list.

*Paul Mason finished 5th in the voting among Mid-Market Program Directors.

*The Zone finished 5th among Mid-Market sports radio stations.

*Ramon, Kayla and Will finished 4th among Mid-Market sports morning shows.

*Buck Reising finished 2nd and Blaine and Mickey finished 5th among Mid-Market sports midday shows.

*3HL finished 2nd among Mid-Market sports afternoon shows.

“I was thrilled to have every one of our shows place in the top five,” said Mason. “I think that just shows the growth of what we’ve done here at The Zone. I couldn’t be anymore happy for our staff. I love the results but we want all of our shows to be number one so that’s going to be our next goal.”

Mason will get a chance to revel in the success of The Zone when he rubs elbows with the entire sports radio industry at the upcoming 2024 Barrett Sports Media Summit in New York City on March 13th and 14th. Mason attended the 2023 Barrett News Media Summit in Nashville in September but this will be his first visit to the BSM Summit. 

“I can’t wait to go to the summit,” said Mason. “If I can go up there and learn one or two things that I can take back here to Nashville and try to figure out how it works within my structure, that’s great but I think I’m going to learn a lot more than that. It’s meeting different people in the industry with a lot of minds coming together and you just never know what you’re going to learn or who you’re going to run into and how it’s going to turn out. I can’t wait to get boots on the ground in New York to check it out.”

While Paul Mason hopes to learn a few things at the BSM Summit, there’s no doubt that other Program Directors and media professionals from around the country will want to pick his brain as well. That’s because Mason has guided The Zone in Nashville to incredible success and there’s no telling what lies ahead.

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Continue Reading

BSM Writers

Reimagining the Relationship Between ESPN and Major League Baseball

So, how can ESPN and MLB’s relationship evolve in their next contract?

Published

on

MLB on ESPN

Last week I wrote about the three media storylines heading into Spring Training with Major League Baseball. One of them was ESPN possibly opting out of their MLB contract after the 2025 season, letting the league know after this season.

MLB’s relationship with ESPN began in January, 1989 when MLB Commissioner Peter Ueberroth agreed to 4-year $400 million agreement with the 10-year-old cable network to begin televising 175 games per season starting in 1990. ESPN was not considered “The Worldwide Leader” yet, they were owned by Capital Cities, not Disney, and ESPN was just one network. It had the rights to the NFL, but split Sunday Night Games with TNT. They had no NHL or NBA rights, so ESPN’s baseball coverage was paramount. It included a nightly highlight show called “Baseball Tonight,” with all the highlights and coverage on each edition of SportsCenter.

Now in 2024, ESPN has 30 exclusive regular season telecasts, and also has coverage of all Wild Card Series games. “Baseball Tonight” is now limited to just a pre-game show before the Sunday Night game. The sport is rarely talked about on ESPN’s marquee shows “Get Up” and “First Take.” Another major difference is ESPN now has the rights to almost everything. The now Disney-owned network airs 23 regular season NFL games and two playoff games. Add in the fact they now have a plethora of NBA and NHL games and MLB went from a priority to an afterthought at ESPN.

ESPN MLB Coverage19902024
Total Games175 (25 exclusive)30 (all exclusive)
Cost Per Year$100M$550M
Nights CoveredSunday (exclusive), Tuesday, Wednesday, FridaySunday and Other Weeknights TBA for 3 games (all exclusive)
Special GamesOpening Day, HolidaysOpening Night, International Game, Little League Classic (counts with SNB)
Baseball Tonight7-Days A Week during SeasonSundays prior to Sunday Night Baseball
Other Notable EventsEquitable Old Timers Game at All-Star GameHome Run Derby, Every Wild Card Series Game
Major Sports on ESPNNFLNFL, NHL, NBA

That deal agreed upon in 1989 was also the last television contract negotiated by Peter Ueberroth, as A. Bartlett Giamatti would take over as baseball’s head man on April 1, 1989. Fast forward 35 years and during Spring Training media day in Florida this past week, current MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said the 2029 season would be his last as commissioner, thus he will have a similar task as Ueberroth did.

As I said last week, consider ESPN opting out of the MLB as a reallocation of their payroll. Disney is in the process of negotiating rights deals with the NBA and have reportedly agreed to a 6-year $7.8 billion deal for the College Football Playoff. So, how can ESPN and MLB’s relationship evolve in their next contract? Here are some options:

Regular Season Games & Coverage

The number of regular season games on ESPN is the amount they want and that’s probably not going to change. Anything more could affect the other entities they have to cover.

However, MLB has a regional sports network (RSN) issue, everyone is aware of this. Even teams that own their own network are worried. Chicago Cubs owner Tom Ricketts said on Monday, “TV is a challenge for everybody right now…we’re going to have to adapt.”

ESPN could use ESPN+ for more MLB games to help the RSN problem. If MLB gets to 15 teams where they takeover production, ESPN+ could be the one-stop-shop for those teams, in-market, while MLB.tv could serve as the out of market option for all teams. ESPN+ could also simulcast “MLB’s Big Inning” which already airs on MLB.tv and Apple TV+ on weekdays. It could bring value to the streamer and more money to the owner’s pockets.

Postseason

The only league that might see the new streaming platform established by Warner Bros. Discovery, FOX Sports and ESPN as a positive is Major League Baseball. They are the only major sports league that airs regular season and postseason games on all three entities. While we mentioned ESPN’s opt-out, WBD and FOX Sports have their deals through 2028. Could the last rights Commissioner Manfred negotiates be to open up WBD and FOX’s deals, and re-negotiate with an extension to 2031.

Why would it benefit WBD and FOX to open up their deals? Right now the Tuesday night baseball games on TBS are non-exclusive, making their contract the only linear TV contract, that is not league owned,  to have a non-exclusive package. Also with their new streaming platform, there is more room to carve out digital rights, and alternate broadcasts, which has become the wave in sports.

Could you imagine FOX with an alt-cast with Jeter, A-Rod, and Big Papi on their FOX Saturday Night games. It could be another version of the “ManningCast.” The big key in this is to establish more postseason rights, and bigger games for ESPN. Here is the current structure.

Current MLB Postseason CoverageESPNTBSFOX
Wild Card SeriesYesNoNo
Division SeriesNoYes (alternating league)Yes (alternating league)
League Championship SeriesNoYes (alternating league)Yes (alternating league)
World SeriesNoNoYes

Here is my proposed idea

Proposed MLB Postseason CoverageESPNTBSFOX
Wild Card Series2 Series (league TBS is not doing)2 Series (same league as LCS)No
Division Series2 Series1 Series (same league as LCS)1 Series (same league as LCS)
League Championship SeriesNoYes (alternate leagues each year)Yes (alternate leagues each year)
World SeriesYes on ABC (even years starting with 2026)NoYes (odd years starting with 2027)

With this proposed idea, the network that loses is FOX, they lose a division series, which means they lose October programming on FS1, and they go from having a World Series every year, to just every other year starting in 2026, That would probably be the biggest hurdle for Commissioner Manfred to clear.

Also the World Series is on a Monday Night, so would ESPN be willing to have competition air on their sister network for a night. Or would they make that the game you possibly bring back an afternoon World Series game – something the sport has not seen since 1987.

Conclusion

This plan gives ESPN more of a reason to be invested in Major League Baseball. Even with the new hockey deal, there’s no more talk about Connor McDavid on the network’s morning shows than there was before. But more exclusivity on the network, and carving more marquee events for ESPN, could give them more reason not only to extend the deal, but still give MLB the money it wants.

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Continue Reading

BSM Writers

Can FOX Sports Solve its Greg Olsen Problem with College Football?

“FOX can keep Olsen and Olsen can stay the network’s top analyst. All that has to happen is the network has to move Greg Olsen from its NFL coverage to its college football coverage.”

Demetri Ravanos

Published

on

Greg Olsen
Courtesy: FOX Sports

Fox seemingly has a problem. It was talked about throughout the playoffs. Tom Brady is really coming aboard next season to join Kevin Burkhardt in FOX’s top NFL booth, which will unseat Greg Olsen, widely considered the best game analyst on TV.

There have been plenty of theories about what to do. Everyone has a thought about which network should cut ties with its top NFL analyst to make room for Olsen. The most obvious answer though is that Olsen gets bumped down a peg to FOX’s number two booth. Currently, that’s Joe Davis and Moose Johnston. What other changes would that necessitate? 

Maybe Amazon moves on from Kirk Herbstreit. Maybe Cris Collinsworth decides to retire, opening up a spot on NBC. Those are the best case scenarios for Olsen, but my guess is FOX does not want to lose him to a competitor. In 2022, I wrote that FOX may not realize what it has in Olsen. I received an email the next day from a FOX executive that said he definitely knows what the network has and thinks Olsen deserves to be in the spotlight in his booth, not playing second fiddle to Tom Brady.

So with that in mind, I have a suggestion. FOX can keep Olsen and Olsen can stay the network’s top analyst. All that has to happen is the network has to move Greg Olsen from its NFL coverage to its college football coverage. It’s a radical idea, but I think it’s a good one.

Don’t get me wrong. There is no reason FOX has to think about replacing Joel Klatt. He also regularly receives high praise for his work. But if the network sees Olsen as a higher priority, this is a chance to keep him in the fold without diminishing his role.

Greg Olsen’s future at FOX probably does not include another Super Bowl. It sucks. I thought he did a great job with Super Bowl LVII. But if the reality is he won’t get to do that again, wouldn’t you rather still be on a top broadcast each week? The College Football Playoff Committee has denied earlier reports that a deal on a new TV contract with ESPN is done. We know FOX really wants a piece of the event. If you’re Greg Olsen and you are open to moving to Big Noon Saturday, there is still a chance that comes along with the chance to call the National Championship Game in the future.

Right now, FOX Sports boss Eric Shanks has to solve the Olsen problem. He can cross the Klatt bridge if it gets to that point, but there are options. Even if his playing days didn’t have the star power of the rest of the Big Noon Kickoff cast, he has established himself as an elite analytical mind. He could move into a featured role on the pregame show. 

Olsen would bring not just star power, but authority. He was a standout tight end for The University of Miami in the early 2000s. It’s undeniably a marquee brand. He was an all-conference performer. He experienced the beginnings of realignment first hand. As a member of the notorious 7th Floor Crew, his college career even has that little bit of infamy and controversy that FOX loves. 

Pairing him with Gus Johnson could be a home run. The energy would be the complete opposite of ESPN, CBS and NBC. Imagine Johnson and Olsen going off the air and then flipping over to whatever game Brad Nessler and Gary Danielson are covering. It would sound like a funeral by comparison.

College football is not the NFL. I get that. But if the last handful of years have proven anything in the sports broadcasting business, it’s that star power matters most of all. Olsen may have proven himself more than capable, but he just can’t compete with Tom Brady in the area that has the most influence on who gets the top job.

Plenty of football fans and media members view college football as a step down from the NFL. I get why, the NFL dwarfs everything else on television. But the college football audience is still trending upward. Nowhere has that been more evident in recent years than at FOX

FOX doesn’t want to lose Olsen, and I don’t think it will. He may have an opt out clause but I am not sure a job that is worthy of exercising it will be available to him. 

So if you’re in charge of FOX and you have an asset like Olsen, you have to ask yourself what the best way to use him is. If Brady is there, there is a ceiling on how high Olsen can go, so do you stick him at the number 2 spot and risk losing him every season, or do you try to sell him on being the number one guy in a new booth – one that already has shown its growth potential? 

Maybe there is no obvious answer, but if FOX wants to pitch Olsen on making the move to college football, it can play to his ego and competitive instincts. That should make it an easy sell.

Sign up for the BSM 8@8

The Top 8 Sports Media Stories of the Day, sent directly to your inbox, every morning at 8am ET.

Invalid email address
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Advertisement

Upcoming Events

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2024 Barrett Media.